Preventing a More Severe Peanut Allergy Reaction

5 replies [Last post]
By Greenlady on Wed, 06-20-07, 14:11

Don't know how reliable this tip is, but I imagine it wouldn't hurt:

[url="http://nurse.lifetips.com/tip/78273/treating-allergies-and-asthma/allergy-information/preventing-a-more-severe-peanut-allergy-reaction.html"]http://nurse.lifetips.com/tip/78273/trea...y-reaction.html[/url]

Preventing a More Severe Peanut Allergy Reaction
In one of seven studies published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, researchers say liquid charcoal, which is often used when people ingest poison to block absorption, can also absorb peanuts.

"After you

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By Corvallis Mom on Wed, 06-20-07, 16:10

... or better yet, keep peanut products out of your home if you have children too young to understand the risks?

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

I think this study is a few years old, actually-- not sure if there has been any follow-up from ER practice.

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By njm on Wed, 06-20-07, 16:46

Dr. Wood says this won't work. If there's known ingestion, the Epipen is required. For reactions with unknown causes, Benadryl and/or Epi is required.

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By Corvallis Mom on Wed, 06-20-07, 17:26

Right. This study wasn't intending to come up with an 'alternate' treatment for anaphylaxis. Just an 'additional' one.

Frankly, during my DD's initial reaction (which is the only one during which she had a KNOWN ingestion) I would have been happy to have a way to avoid additional absorption of pn protein once the reaction started.

That's what I think the point of the original study was-- just that in an ER or EMS/first responder situation, activated charcoal can be used [i]ALSO[/i] to help mitigate on-going absorption. The idea being that you can limit the scope of a reaction, even one that is in progress. It might mean the difference between overnight in the ER and two or three days in ICU.

I just thought the quote was amusing in its own right. After all, it is usually easy enough to avoid 'obvious' and 'massive' ingestions.

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By Greenlady on Wed, 06-20-07, 19:25

Thanks for the catch! In quoting this tip, I didn't mean to imply that an epipen was not necessary. I just thought that after the epipen and while waiting for the ambulance to arrive, it probably wouldn't hurt to have some liquid charcoal, if you have it around already.

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By April in KC on Thu, 06-28-07, 17:47

Nate's doc told us on our last visit to Children's Mercy clinics to add Activated Charcoal to our ER action plan for ingestion reactions. IN ADDITION TO (and after) Epinephrine. He felt very strongly about this, and even said to have the ER staff call him if they didn't want to do it.

He said it would help with the biphasic / secondary reactions as the peanut protein travels through the gut.

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