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5 Year old's recent anaphylaxis

Recently my 5 year old PA daughter was eating a butter type cookie from a mass producing bakery. The package stated the possible allergens as wheat milk, and soy on the package. The bakery claims to use a "may contain" statement if cookies are produced on shared equipment and states their equipment is cleaned thoroughly between batches. There was no such statement on the package. Within 10 minutes of consumption she was in full anaphylaxis requiring the use of her EpiPen, antihistamine and 911 activation. She required additional medications in the emergency dept.

I contacted the bakery to file a report in hopes no one else would be affected.

I was poorly prepared for the types of questions I was asked such as, "can you return the rest of the product for testing" and "what else did your child eat for 24 hours prior to the incident" Would you please print guidelines for your readers helping them through the reporting process?

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By PeanutAllergy.com on Sun, 03-20-16, 14:52

Question of the Week: Answered!

Every week, PeanutAllergy.com answers one of the questions posted in our community.

Our Answer:

Thank you for your question. We are very sorry to hear your child recently went through that experience.

It’s always a good idea to report these things so that others don’t go through the same experience. The bakery should definitely be aware of what happened.

Especially when children are young, it’s a good idea to keep track of any new foods they are introducing into their diet. Generally speaking, you want to leave three to five in days in between introducing a child to a new food. That might have been why the bakery asked what else your child ate in the last 24 hours. However, if you child had an anaphylaxis reaction and didn’t eat anything after this particular food, it is highly likely the reaction was a result of that food. To learn more about introducing new food to a young child, click here.

It’s also important to review EpiPen use throughout the year, not only for yourself but for close family members. Unfortunately anaphylaxis reactions can occur unexpectedly sometimes so it’s good to be prepared. For tips on reviewing proper auto-injector use, click here.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration also has a guide online for reporting these sorts of issues (although since you knew the bakery’s contact information directly, you took the right course of action). The FDA definitely mentions keeping the packaging to look at labels. You also should keep track of when the product was bought and where. You can see more information on reporting incidents here.

We also reached out to our Facebook community with your question, and you can see their responses here.

We hope this information helps. Take care!

Groups: None
By PeanutAllergy.com on Sun, 03-20-16, 14:52

Question of the Week: Answered!

Every week, PeanutAllergy.com answers one of the questions posted in our community.

Our Answer:

Thank you for your question. We are very sorry to hear your child recently went through that experience.

It’s always a good idea to report these things so that others don’t go through the same experience. The bakery should definitely be aware of what happened.

Especially when children are young, it’s a good idea to keep track of any new foods they are introducing into their diet. Generally speaking, you want to leave three to five in days in between introducing a child to a new food. That might have been why the bakery asked what else your child ate in the last 24 hours. However, if you child had an anaphylaxis reaction and didn’t eat anything after this particular food, it is highly likely the reaction was a result of that food. To learn more about introducing new food to a young child, click here.

It’s also important to review EpiPen use throughout the year, not only for yourself but for close family members. Unfortunately anaphylaxis reactions can occur unexpectedl sometimes so it’s good to be prepared. For tips on reviewing proper auto-injtector use, click here.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration also has a guide online for reporting these sorts of issues (although since you knew the bakery’s contact information directly, you took the right course of action). The FDA definitely mentions keeping the packaging to look at labels. You also should keep track of when the product was bought and where. You can see more information on reporting incidents here.

We also reached out to our Facebook community with your question, and you can see their responses here.

We hope this information helps. Take care!

Groups: None

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