Questions on peanut allergy test results

My son tested positive for peanut allergy 2.5 years ago via a blood test. He had rashes on his face, swelling around his eyes and mouth; and he kept scratching his tongue, after eating one bite of peanut butter. The test results was 8.49 then. We haven't given him peanut since. He had no reaction to other nuts and has been eating other nuts regularly. I thought that could reduce his peanut allergy level since these nuts "may have been processed on facilities that also process peanuts". He is going to kindergarten this fall. I got him tested again over a week ago using the same blood test. I was shocked when informed that the number has jumped to 31.6. I cannot make sense out of the test results. Could anyone explain why the numbers has gone up with possibly continued exposure? What would it take to trigger a sever reaction at this level? I am very worried. The number seems so high. We haven't taken it that seriously other than avoiding peanut in the ingredient. Thank you.

By blprestangen on Mon, 04-01-13, 16:19

I don't know if this will help, but my 15 month old son ate one peanut butter sandwich. His reaction to that was so severe we ended up in the hospital, over night. Swollen eyes, hives and throat swelling to the point of airway constriction were his reactive symptoms. THREE doses of epinephrine were given to him to reverse the anaphalactic reaction. When given the RASP test, he had a reading of 28. I was told that anything over 17 was considered life threatening, hence, anaphalaxis. Since then, we avoid ANY peanuts or anything that might even come close to being contaminated with them. Peanut dust from dry roasted peanuts at the ballpark (not eaten by us, just in the vacinity of where we were sitting) had a reaction on him of eye swelling and coughing. The perscribed Benedryl helped with that. Please don't take your childs allergy lightly. You don't ever want to say "I wish I would have...".

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