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Prescription for EpipenJR denied

Hello, I am a new mom! My daughter (17 month old) was diagnosed this past Saturday with peanut allergies after a severe reaction. It was the scariest things I've ever been through. She only had contact with peanut butter and in less than 3 minutes her face swelled up and her eyes closed. Well long story short we took her to the ER where she got stable and they told us to take her to her pediatrician for further testing and a prescription for an epipen since it was so bad. Her pedi is out of town for our luck so the nurse told us to go to an urgent care office to get a prescription. The Dr refused to give us the prescription because she is not in school! !!! WHAT? EXCUSE YOU? so my daughter can get the medication she needs in case of an emergency? Seriously? I'm in disbelief that they can do such a thing

By ssr.family on Mon, 06-22-15, 23:25

That's exactly what I thought! I am stalking my pedi until I get a prescription. I am beyond upset with her ignorance right now, I'm sure she has never seen someone with an allergic reaction because not because she's a baby it doesn't mean is less dangerous. She already got an epipen shot at the hospital, what's the difference?

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By smithdcrk on Mon, 06-22-15, 23:10

"Not in School" is no excuse.

It is frustrating to know what you need to do, commit to the plan and then be thwarted.

Step 1: Go back to your pediatrician's office and describe your experience. If your pediatrician is out of town, and no one in the office can call in an Rx on his behalf, find out if he has someone covering his patients to see about getting one filled with their help.

Step 2: (Before you hang up) Get a referral from the pediatrician's office for an appointment with an allergist? Some insurance plans need a "prescription" or referral form to approve a specialist. The allergist is also one of the best places to learn about and to conduct the additional testing. Our daughter's allergy medicines (food and seasonal) are coordinated through her allergist.

If that fails, can the attending doctor at the ER write the prescription? S/he saw the severity of the reaction and was the one to make the suggestion to get an Epi Pen.

To be fair, the EpiPen contains a controlled substance, epinephrine - it is a stimulant. Kids in school usually require a waiver to carry this medicine with them. An urgent care doctor who does not know you, may be hesitant to fill the prescription.

Also, according to the website, EpiPen Jr® Auto?Injector contains 0.15 mg of epinephrine for children weighing 33 to 66 pounds. Prescribing a higher than recommended dose, is something you and your child's doctor should discuss and decide. My daughter has always been petite, so age and weight dosages were never in sync. We appreciated the input from on doctors so she was dosed safely.

By ssr.family on Mon, 06-22-15, 23:30

Thank you so much for your respince and advice!!!!That's exactly what I thought! I am stalking my pedi until I get a prescription and a referral as well. I am beyond upset with her ignorance right now, I'm sure she has never seen someone with an allergic reaction because not because she's a baby it doesn't mean is less dangerous. She already got an epipen shot at the hospital, what's the difference? My daughter is very petite as well she is only 17.4 pounds and 27 inches hopefully her pediatrician will write the prescription I rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it! On the other hand I also want to know if she is allergic to other things as well! So I really want to take her to an allergist asap!

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