Login | Register

Delta airlines

5 replies [Last post]
By wvandemark on Wed, 11-05-08, 01:50

The more I think about the fact that Delta Airlines serves peanuts on their flights, the angrier I become. 2 nights ago my family and I could not board our flight because their incredibly rude crew stated to us that they, "MUST serve peanuts. It is an order from corporate." We pleaded with them and they stated that the best they could do is provide a 3 row buffer zone. What does that mean? Are they allergy specialists? Do they understand something that my husband and myself (both doctors) don't know? They don't carry epi pens, they have filthy peanut-laden planes....how can they sell the tickets without a disclaimer?

They can't have it both ways. If they INSIST on giving the nasty, dry, cheap peanuts, instead of the countless other nasty, dry, cheap snacks they could serve...then don't sell tickets to peanut allergic people. But WHY?! Why do they HAVE to serve peanuts? They really, really don't care about my son or anyone else with a peanut allergy. What about some poor child whose parents don't understand peanut allergy and trust the "Delta guidelines". They are going to hurt someone! How is this OK? Please help me make a statement to Delta. I don't want their money...I want them to stop serving peanuts.

Groups: None
By ajas_folks on Tue, 12-02-08, 18:37

Delta Airlines made this choice some years back -- they (among others) were powerful in their lobbying against FAA rules or Fed legislation that would bar them from serving peanuts on board. One way many of us deal with this is to vote with our wallets and take our business elsewhere -- flying those airlines that DO fully accomodate those with the hidden medical disability of life-threatening food allergies. However, if you live in a small town or an area with limited airline service, this can be very hard to work around.

It isn't just the airlines who refuse to accomodate this life-threatening medical disability.

It's the majority of our schools (public and private) in this nation too.

As you try to formulate the statement (letter or public post) aimed at Delta, I would recommend reading here and at other great support boards in the SCHOOLS sections about ADA, section 504, and accommodations required by Federal Law. Then, combine that with your (both you & DH) medical knowledge and write a sledgehammer of a letter.

Other suggested boards where you might work to get something going by posting your experiences and do additional research:

[url="http://www.foodallergysupport.com"]http://www.foodallergysupport.com[/url]
(a re-direct to the free allergy boards at hyperboards -- many former and some current members from this board are there now)

[url="http://www.kidswithfoodallergies.org/"]http://www.kidswithfoodallergies.org/[/url]
(requires paid membership to access the full support boards)

Glad you and your family got home safely, even if it meant tremendous inconvenience and an eyeopening experience that shows you and your children how the almighty dollar is more important than a passenger's (or student's in the case of school) life.

Groups: None
By ddg on Sun, 09-06-09, 14:56

I agree completely. I've been severely allergic to peanuts since I was an infant. Recently got retested and my allergy is still off the charts. A couple of months ago, I actually arranged ahead of time to have my delta flight peanut free (or so I thought) once I got on board, the flight attendants informed me 1)that they had no record of my peanut-allergy and my request not to serve peanuts on the plane and 2) that the best they could do was offer me that "buffer zone." this buffer zone idea is really is the most ridiculous thing ever, since the air gets recycled throughout the flight anyway. this company seriously has to be minutes away from being sued? I figured this might be a new company policy or something, but your post is from 2008, which makes me even more concerned!

moreover--and this is really egregious--almost funny if it weren't so serious--after I had the conversation about the "peanut buffer zone" in my area, I looked down and much to my dismay found that someone in the middle seat--the seat next to my assigned seat--managed to open a bag of peanuts, not eat any of them, and spilled crushed peanuts ALL OVER the floor under me. this was just too much. so then I had to have the flight attendants come and vaccume+clean the area. I'm sure that the people around me thought I was insane (it seems that a lot of people don't understand severe allergies) but I wasn't taking any chances. Luckily I had family on the flight, so I switched seats.

*i believe the reason they serve peanuts is because they're a southern based company--for that reason I think they can get peanuts for very cheap.

Once the flight attendants announced to the "buffer zone" passengers that they were seated in a peanut free zone, everyone seemed pretty cooperative. One man even gave me his unopened bag of trailmix to read the ingredients. shockingly, this man managed to buy *the one* bag of trailmix in the history of the world with no peanuts/peanut traces! Anyway though, it seemed that the informed passengers were willing to cooperate once they knew about how serious it was. it seems as though the VERY least delta could do would be to make an announcement over the intercom about a severe allergy on the flight (obviously they should not serve little bags of peanuts to everyone, but they seem pretty excited about that for whatever reason) I think if they made a general announcement there would be fewer people that would eat the offered peanuts in-flight. it really seems that the only way this horrible company will stop serving peanuts is if someone goes into anaphylatic shock in-flight and their family ends up suing.

Groups: None
By artoflife on Sun, 09-06-09, 17:42

I myself have stopped flyign Delta. One more than one flight I have dealt with the same thing. Calling in advance to let them know of my allergy and arrriving to find out they have no record of it. And to top it off how rude the flight staff is. After one flight I called corporate to help the situation for future flight goers, I was shuffled around between person to person and finally spoke with someone who claimed to be in management and was just plain rude. There was no customer service. I also will no longer fly Northwest. They have merged with Delta and have taken on the Delta "we don't care about peanut allergies" agenda.
To calm fears a little bit I have done a bit of research on flights. The 3 row buffer zone is a legal law. They must provide this - 3 rows in front and 3 rows behind. All air is not recycled in the cabin as well. The plane takes in 10% new air at all times from outside of the cabin.. so on longer flights it is feasable to have entirely new air by the end of the trip, with the continuous 10% new air being pumped into the cabin. On the down side - their is still 90% of the same old air with peanut dust in it until it too gets ventilated out of the cabin.
Some tricks I have found help are to bring a stock of snacks with me. I bring goldfish, pretzels, crackers, cookies. I use these incase soemone next to me has brought on board a peanut snack... i may be able to barter with them to eat my goodies instead. I also always have an extra shirt or something I can out in front of my face to breath through if someone does open a bag of peanuts. Lastly I report my allergy numerous times. I call the airlines ahead of time about 2 weeks in advance. Then I tell the attendant at the fornt gates before boarding is anywhere near about my allergy. I often bring a doctor's note and show my epi-pen. I bring a stock of melting or liquid benadryl or zyrtek. I tell the head attendant on board the flight when I enter. "Just to let them know where I'm sitting". Sometimes the captain will announce that there is a severe peanut allergic person over the speaker, soemtimes they will switch all snacks if possible. I find Southwest, Airtran, and United have been very good to me with my allergies. As for Delta, I go by the wallet adagio, I won't support their business with service like that.

Groups: None
By Madi on Mon, 01-03-11, 02:27

Recently we were on a Continental flight from Costa Rica and had to stop in Houston, Texas. I had in my reservation that my 2 sons are anaphylactic.
We are very careful and will not eat or be around any dangerous peanuts or nuts. When we told Continental that our youngest son was highly allergic and please do not serve peanuts they asked us to leave the plane, move our seat for people on this plane paid for the peanuts.
We were very polite and curtious to the staff so they were kind to us in the way they spoke. Needless to say, I am an emotional mother and realized since this happened 2 times on the way back with the staff that I was up against not just this idiotic supervisor, but Continental airlines, all airlines and the peanut growers and Washington. These people are to big for me and I am confused on what to do. Do I bring a mask for our son? I had an epi pen, note from dr.,begged and pleaded with the airlines that this could cause a death on this plane. Also if someone did chose their paid for peanuts I would go after them and tell them not to eat them. Were they prepared for a commotion. Would I be handcuffed and put in jail for trying to protect my child? Should I never fly, since we are an increasing minority of peanut allergic people. Someone high up in power has never experienced this feeling of helplessness. What to do? I will consult my allergist, Legislator, write to all the airlines. Can a bill be passed so that flying on airplanes certain foods are not allowed. Just like NO SMOKING on the airplane was constant on this international flight. My son has me to protect him now, but what will happen when he travels alone with crazy people insistent on watching people suffer and be distraught for they have the right to enforce giving peanuts vs pretzels. What would happen if my son died? No one would care. Unless it happens to them no one knows the feeling. Both times the supervisors tried to be sympathetic, but they had to serve the peanuts. Eventually they asked everyone personally not to have the peanuts b/c our son was allergic. One person objected. Curious and ignorant or just sick. Should I consult a lawyer as what to do.
Will keep investigating for the sake of all peanut and nut allergic people.

Groups: None
By Madi on Mon, 01-03-11, 02:27

Recently we were on a Continental flight from Costa Rica and had to stop in Houston, Texas. I had in my reservation that my 2 sons are anaphylactic.
We are very careful and will not eat or be around any dangerous peanuts or nuts. When we told Continental that our youngest son was highly allergic and please do not serve peanuts they asked us to leave the plane, move our seat for people on this plane paid for the peanuts.
We were very polite and curtious to the staff so they were kind to us in the way they spoke. Needless to say, I am an emotional mother and realized since this happened 2 times on the way back with the staff that I was up against not just this idiotic supervisor, but Continental airlines, all airlines and the peanut growers and Washington. These people are to big for me and I am confused on what to do. Do I bring a mask for our son? I had an epi pen, note from dr.,begged and pleaded with the airlines that this could cause a death on this plane. Also if someone did chose their paid for peanuts I would go after them and tell them not to eat them. Were they prepared for a commotion. Would I be handcuffed and put in jail for trying to protect my child? Should I never fly, since we are an increasing minority of peanut allergic people. Someone high up in power has never experienced this feeling of helplessness. What to do? I will consult my allergist, Legislator, write to all the airlines. Can a bill be passed so that flying on airplanes certain foods are not allowed. Just like NO SMOKING on the airplane was constant on this international flight. My son has me to protect him now, but what will happen when he travels alone with crazy people insistent on watching people suffer and be distraught for they have the right to enforce giving peanuts vs pretzels. What would happen if my son died? No one would care. Unless it happens to them no one knows the feeling. Both times the supervisors tried to be sympathetic, but they had to serve the peanuts. Eventually they asked everyone personally not to have the peanuts b/c our son was allergic. One person objected. Curious and ignorant or just sick. Should I consult a lawyer as what to do.
Will keep investigating for the sake of all peanut and nut allergic people.

Groups: None

Peanut Free and Nut Free Directory

Our directory is highlights our favorite products for people with peanut and nut allergies.

Close x

Sign up for our newsletter and receive a free peanut-free snack guide.

Stay on top of your allergy with recipes, lifestyle tips and more.

Email