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Can peanut odors cause anaphylactic reactions?

22 replies [Last post]
By Driving Me Nutty on Wed, 04-07-04, 04:24

I recall reading that Dr. Sampson indicated that it is very rare for someone to have an ana. reaction from inhaling peanut proteins. But now I can't find that article.

Has anyone read similar? or opposing information?

Here's a link to the AAAAI websit but it doesn't have any strong basis -
[url="http://www.aaaai.org/aadmc/inthenews/wypr/2003archive/peanut_odors.html"]http://www.aaaai.org/aadmc/inthenews/wypr/2003archive/peanut_odors.html[/url]

Thanks,
Pamela

------------------
Mom to Karissa 6/29/01 (PA>100 CAP RAST and TNA level 3)

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By Syd's Mom on Wed, 04-07-04, 08:55

Here's some supporting information on research into inhalation reactions.
(Obtained from Dr.John Weisnagel research website at: [url="http://www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm"]http://www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm[/url]
More specifically under the "odor" section:
[url="http://www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm#odor"]http://www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm#odor[/url]
On Feb 23d, 2002, the AQAA (Association Qu

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By MommaBear on Wed, 04-07-04, 16:13

Quote:Originally posted by Syd's Mom:
[b]
-"Two things are very clear to me as this debate continues to develop: education and preparedness should prevail. . . In the final analysis, more objective data and proper education will help guide us in the ultimate resolution of this important debate and lower the tension in the peanut gallery." 77 (posted Aug. 1st, 1999)

[/b]

(quote from article posted by syd's mom)

Meaning: having a *good* emergency plan and increasing "awareness" possibly are [i]pivotal[/i]?

Anyone?

another quote from article:

"I e-mailed Dr. Hourihane, asking his opinion on the importance of peanut odor, and this was his response: "I am not personally aware of proven anaphylaxis associated with the smell but it is often related by parents that the child has become lethargic and clingy after entering a room with peanuts open in the room. This cannot be called anaphylaxis with any confidence. My feeling is that some people really do degranulate on inhaled exposure (Dr. Hourihane is referring to degranulation of cells involved in allergic reactions, specifically mastocytes, meaning they have a typical allergic reaction) but the reactions are minor - usually upper airway and eyes with some urticaria (hives) maybe. The major problem when exposed like this is panic especially on planes and in other confined spaces." (posted April 8th, 1999)
The paper presented at the Orlando Meeting of the AAAA&I (summarized above) has now been published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, July 1999, vol 104, 186-9."

[b]Mast Cell Degranulation[/b].

[i]noting.[/i]

[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited April 07, 2004).]

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By Driving Me Nutty on Wed, 04-07-04, 17:27

Quote:Originally posted by Syd's Mom:
[b] suspected PN exposures occurred by mouth (20), skin (8), and inhalation (14)
reactions generally occurred within 10 minutes of exposure (32/42);
reaction severity correlated with exposure route (mouth > inhalation > skin)
[/b]

Thanks Syds Mom for posting all of that! Very interesting studies. I had always assumed that an inhaled reaction wouldn't be as severe as a contact/skin exposure but this study (based on an airplane environment) indicates otherwise.

MB, I would agree that pretty mundane statement "education and preparedness should prevail" but yes, I agree. Unfortanately it only seems that United and American airlines are 'listening' to these studies.

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By usmcwife4ever on Sun, 06-13-04, 22:31

Our daughter had a pa reaction to airborne particles at the mall. It was not anaphylactic. Well, it was hives, runny nose, and runny diaper so *technically* it more than two body systems. We were in Old Navy and the peanut shop outside was cooking nuts in an open cooker, the smell got to her in Old Navy and she started reacting. The great part, our inlaws own that store. We now have to avoid that entire row of stores at the mall and I am very worried about future airborne reactions.

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By Lovey on Thu, 06-24-04, 23:50

Although this study was not with peanuts, the principles are basically the same.

[url="http://allergy.edoc.com/1997_archives/pdf/jan_97/35.pdf"]http://allergy.edoc.com/1997_archives/pdf/jan_97/35.pdf[/url]

Inhalation reactions do happen with food allergies and can be severe.

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By rebekahc on Fri, 06-25-04, 06:06

My DS and I both have airborn reactions and technically they could be called anaphylactic if you use the 2 body system definition. I have always removed us from the airborn exposure as soon as we started reacting (which I assume most people do get the he!! out of there). Maybe anaphylaxis is "rare" or "unlikely" from airborn exposure because people get out of the situation. I believe that if my DS or I stayed in the situation our reactions could easily progress to full-blown anaphylaxis. I believe inhalation reactions are slower to progress thus giving the allergic person time to remove themselves before reaching a critical state.

My DS's airborn reactions usually are asthma and eyes swelling. I will do any or all of the following (usually at least 3 or 4 of them) - sneeze constantly, profusely runny/watery eyes and nose, face itching, eyes swelling, rash on exposed skin, lips swelling, throat itching, wheezing. My symptoms usually go away quickly when I leave the situation. DS's symptoms usually take longer to disappear.

Rebekah

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By MQriley2 on Fri, 06-25-04, 16:09

That is nice to know because my allergist just told me last week that airborne cannot cause ana. I asked him if he was sure, because I could have sworn I had read here were someone had, and he said nope that it had to be touched and ingested.

------------------
Renee athma/EA
Quinton: PA/TNA/Soy/EA/Severe Asthma/whole egg/onion/cocoa bean/chicken/turkey/string beans/potato
Mykiaja: EA/asthma
Taylor: EA/asthma

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By mamagaona on Fri, 06-25-04, 16:50

I don't give a bleep what the research says about it. My dd gets a migraine when she is around the "smell" of peanut butter, even when she is not aware it is around. That is good enough for me to keep her at the peanut free table at school.

Migraine also happens to be her first sign of anaphylaxis.

Arlene

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By Scared Nutless on Fri, 06-25-04, 18:59

My dd has also had nasty reaction to peanut fumes. DD started reacting with itchy face (hives starting to form), runny nose, ear pain (which doc said indicates throat swelling), dizzyness. We looked around and there was a little boy eating pn. We didn't even know until dd started reacting. We gave benadryl right away and reaction stopped.

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By Driving Me Nutty on Sat, 06-26-04, 03:49

Quote:Originally posted by rebekahc:
[b]My DS and I both have airborn reactions and technically they could be called anaphylactic if you use the 2 body system definition...
My DS's airborn reactions usually are asthma and eyes swelling. I will do any or all of the following (usually at least 3 or 4 of them) - sneeze constantly, profusely runny/watery eyes and nose, face itching, eyes swelling, rash on exposed skin, lips swelling, throat itching, wheezing. My symptoms usually go away quickly when I leave the situation. DS's symptoms usually take longer to disappear.
Rebekah[/b]

Thanks Rebekah for your input. I am also curious, was either your and your son's reaction to peanuts themselves or to peanut butter. I'm trying to differentiate between smelling the odor and inhaling the peanut proteins.

Thanks!

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By rebekahc on Sun, 06-27-04, 04:11

Driving Me Nutty - we react to both peanuts and peanut butter equally. We are around pb/pb products more frequently than just plain old peanuts so I have more examples of pb/pb products but I've seen no real difference in reaction between the two.

Rebekah

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By judansmom on Sat, 07-31-04, 03:29

We are new to PA....
In these situations do you give the epi, benadryl or what. How do you know? I've read that reactions can take anywhere from seconds to a couple of hours so how do you know if it's from inhalation, contact or accidental ingestion? AAhhhh

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By meadow on Mon, 08-30-04, 11:03

Driving Me Nutty,

I just had this very conversation with my doctor. My daughter is airborne reactive and I asked if it could turn into an anaphylactic reaction. He told me it has happened, but is rare. It usually happens in those individuals with asthma because their airways are already sensitive. This is my daughter. He didn't site any book or anything.

I hope this helps you.

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By LaurensMom on Tue, 08-31-04, 01:42

My daughter is airborne reactive.

Being in the same room with Chinese food that contained peanuts caused a bi-phasic anaphylactic reaction.

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By b and c on Mon, 09-06-04, 21:37

Judansmom,
Get out of the room and asses the situation. If you don't think there has been any chance in ingestion, than a little Benadryl won't hurt. If there is significant swelling and or airway constriction, than use the Epi-Pen.

Brian

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By phoenixrizing69 on Wed, 02-13-08, 21:56

I know this is a really old thread but I have had this same debate with a couple of my suitemates. They insist on eating peanuts and peanut products and other nuts and their products around me all the time, usually in an enclosed room (dorm room)and I start getting migraines and stomach cramps. When I ask them to remove the pn or tn (or their products) they say that its impossible to have an airborne reaction. "No one can start reacting from the smell." exact words from one of my suitemates (who's mom also happens to work at my allergists). Its good to know that its not all in my head. I also start getting itchy around my lips and my throat dries out real quick. Never had an anaphylactic reaction...yet.

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By SkyMom on Wed, 02-13-08, 22:05

This article by a well known allergist discusses this briefly. Hope it helps.

[url="http://www.drrobertwood.com/airborne-peanut-risk.shtml"]Dr. Wood[/url]

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By blsdmom on Sat, 02-16-08, 00:36

Hi,
Two years ago my daughter had an airborne reaction to peanuts/tree nuts. We were at a party and someone had just opened a can of mixed nuts in the living room and placed it on the coffee table. My daughter and I walked in about 5 minutes later (not knowing the nuts were on the table) and she began coughing..within one minute she had hives on her face plus she had a darkening/reddish color under her eyes. Thankfully, it did not go any further than that however, I do know that each exposure is different plus, each reaction tends to get worse (example, the first exposure may be hives, the second may be breathing difficulties, the third may be a full anaphylactic reaction)
My advice...educate the people you are living with as much as possible and if no solution is found, go higher up in authority. Sounds like you live in a college dorm...there should be someone you can consult about this issue.
Blessed Mom

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By phoenixrizing69 on Wed, 02-20-08, 19:31

I do live in a college dorm room. We have a lot of programs given by the RA's in my dorm and when ever I see that food is going to be present I always talk with my RA about it. He is awesome at making sure I feel safe while still living on campus. Earlier this week one of the other floor's RA's held a program about stress and time management (midterms are coming up) and the food was a PB&J crunch wrap! I talked with my RA about it and he talked to the RA holding the program. I couldn't go, but I was more concerned about people eating the wraps and then touching door handles, stair railing, elevator buttons, etc. with out washing their hands. I haven't had a problem. I personally can't wait to get to off campus in August.

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By BohemianBrunette on Fri, 02-22-08, 04:38

Originally Posted By: phoenixrizing69I know this is a really old thread but I have had this same debate with a couple of my suitemates. They insist on eating peanuts and peanut products and other nuts and their products around me all the time, usually in an enclosed room (dorm room)and I start getting migraines and stomach cramps. When I ask them to remove the pn or tn (or their products) they say that its impossible to have an airborne reaction. "No one can start reacting from the smell." exact words from one of my suitemates (who's mom also happens to work at my allergists). Its good to know that its not all in my head. I also start getting itchy around my lips and my throat dries out real quick. Never had an anaphylactic reaction...yet.

Wow......I think it might be a good idea for you to live in a single room. If your roommates don't care that they're making you sick, the peace of mind might be worth the extra money. Now, I'm not PA, and I actually eat peanuts and nuts on a regular basis, since I'm a vegetarian living on a student's budget, but if I had a roommate who was allergic, then I'd respect his or her safety by keeping the house/apartment/whatever free of all things nutty, and only eating these things outside of the home.

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By phoenixrizing69 on Fri, 02-22-08, 05:23

I have two more months of living in the dorms :D and my roommate doesn't eat nuts or peanuts. After that I am living in an apartment where me and my roommates have decided that the common areas of the apartment are going to be nut and peanut free.

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By Geeno on Sat, 02-21-09, 05:41

Living in dorms with the allergy was extremely rough.

I had a caring yet incredibly dense roommate who would always be grabbing the door handle and other common use items. I'd also have clorox wipes chillin just incase.

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