benadryl vs. epi-pen

41 replies [Last post]
By pjama0502 on Sat, 09-27-03, 15:58

Hello all,

I am quite new to pa (my 17 mo old son has it).
Last week we were issued an epi-pen. The allergist did not mention using benadryl, but I notice a lot of people seem to use benadryl when a reaction is first suspected.

My question is: when do you use benadryl and when do use the epi-pen?

For those who have administered benadryl: do you use adult benadryl or children's benadryl and how much do you give?

Thanks!

Jen

Groups: None
By Susanhopes on Sat, 09-27-03, 16:28

Hi Jen, and welcome to the wonderful world of PA. My 18mo DD is PA and, I suspect, TNA.

We just found out a few months ago too, and there's a big learning curve ahead of you. I recommend getting one or more of the books that are linked to this site to get you up to speed. Surprised that the allergist didn't explain things better but then they have HMOs dogging their heels. It turns out that parents have to do a lot of self-educating on this issue anyway. Get ready to be your DS's best health advocate.

Also, you may want to look at the FAAN (food allergy and anaphylaxis network) site. You can join and get their newsletter, it's very informative.

Briefly, Benadryl is for minor reactions like hives and a little facial swelling. Your EpiJr is for full anaphylaxis, when DS can't breathe. You may want to look into the 2 pack of pens that comes with a trainer, very good to practice the technique. I keep one pen in my purse and the other in a fanny pack that goes with DH when he has DD out or to non-purse occasions. Both have a small bottle of children's benadryl with DD's name and dosage marked on a piece of tape (target store brand) and a dosing syringe. The dosage at this age is according to the doc's instructions since they are under 2, it depends upon weight.

GL with your "studies!"

Susan

Groups: None
By CorinneM1 on Sat, 09-27-03, 20:42

Hi, and welcome.

My son (2 yrs) has only had one reaction to peanuts, which resulted in hives. At the time we didn't know what that he was allergic to nuts, but we gave him childrens benedryl which helps ease the hives and the puffy eyes.

We carry childrens benedryl with us, as well as 2 epi pens when we are out (in case one misfires). If you have only one epi pen, please consider asking your doctor for another prescription.

These 2 always stay in his diaper bag and we have an additional one in his medicine drawer in his room. Also, his daycare has one, as well as my mom (since he spends time at their house a few days a month as well).

In terms of dosage, I would go by weight or your drs recommendation. And from what I am reading here, if your child goes beyond hives, use the epi pen and call 911.

Groups: None
By Carefulmom on Sat, 09-27-03, 21:02

I would definitely NOT wait until your child can`t breathe to use the Epi. I used it only once and that was for hives, swelling around the eyes, and some wheezing. She was not having any trouble breathing at all. Her allergist said I did the right thing by using it. I NEVER would have waited for her to have trouble breathing. If you use it too late in the reaction, it may not work (because once the blood pressure has dropped then the epinephrine would sit in the leg where you inject it, and not go to the heart, lungs, etc.) That was why Nathan Walters died despite using the epi---because it was used too late in the reaction. I have read to use the Epi if two or more organ systems are affected or if breathing is affected. As far as the Benadryl, I used Zyrtec (similar to Benadryl) after the Epi so that it would start working when the Epi wore off. And yes, you should also call 911.

[This message has been edited by Carefulmom (edited September 27, 2003).]

Groups: None
By attlun on Sat, 09-27-03, 23:06

Hi,
My PA son just turned 2, and his last reaction (and 1st since we found out he was PA), I tried giving him Benadryl first like the allergist had told me to, and he couldn't even swallow it because is throat was so swollen. I will always give epi at first sign of a reaction now!

------------------
Tina
Trevor 8/6/01
Harmony 1/22/03

__________________

*Tina
Trevor-4, PA
Harmony-3, NKA
Trace-21 months, KNA

Groups: None
By Susanhopes on Sun, 09-28-03, 00:24

As I said above, I'm still on the learning curve myself! Thanks to Carefulmom and others for clarifying how early you should use the Epi. (I guess I really meant "trouble breathing" instead of "not breathing" and wasn't clear enough there.) It's good to hear about people actually using the Epis and what that was like We haven't and have not encountered another reaction to have to make that decision. Let's hope few of us will have to do so.

Susan

Groups: None
By Carefulmom on Sun, 09-28-03, 00:45

I would definitely say if you are not sure whether to do it or not and you are sort of vascillating when it happens, you should probably do it. DD was not having any trouble breathing when I did it, and she was not wheezing a lot. I did it because she had three organ systems affected, and I used the two or more rule. By the way, she was fine within 60 seconds after I used it--it works very fast! However about two hours later the rash came back. By then she had already seen the doctor, and he had sent me home with steriods for if the rash came back. I have since learned that you should stay at the doctor`s for 3 to 4 hours because there can be a second phase to the reaction. However, we did not do that. Next time if she was released that soon, I would probably park outside until the time was up.

Groups: None
By StaceyK on Sun, 09-28-03, 00:48

We have an ER plan based on a version a doctor recommended at a food allergy seminar. Here it is:

After exposure to peanuts, tree nuts, any peanut or nut-containing product, observe for the following symptoms:

Groups: None
By darthcleo on Sun, 09-28-03, 01:41

all the comments so far have been quite good. I would simply add, from our ER plan:

if there's been a KNOWN *ingestion* of peanuts/nuts/whatchamacallit, you can give the Epi even before symptoms start.

But then, you should discuss all of those points with your doctor. We are not giving medical advice.

__________________

*** ENRICHED ***
GO TEAM CANADA

Groups: None
By DebO on Sun, 09-28-03, 14:15

Hi

I agree that it is very important you discuss this with a doctor. When either of my children has a possible exposure WITH ME, I will administer benadryl and observe and be ready with the epipen if necessary. I know my children and am familiar with their reactions.

Anywhere else, I do not even give them benadryl. I do not think it is fair for me to expect a teacher at school or a coach at gymnastics to use judgement of the severity of the reaction. My procedure is for them to use the epi and send my child to th ER. I would far rather have a doctor in the ER judging the severity of the reaction.

Just my opinion.

Take care

deb

__________________

[B]**ENRICHED**{/B}

Groups: None
By Carefulmom on Sun, 09-28-03, 15:27

Well, here`s another opinion. Our allergist said the antihistamine (we use Zyrtec, similar to Benadryl) is for AFTER the Epi is used. He said not to use an antihistamine first to see if the reaction gets better because the hives or whatever could get better while the blood pressure is dropping and once the blood pressure has dropped the Epi may not work (same as above, the leg is not being perfused once the blood pressure has dropped so the epinephrine sits in the leg). So for that reason I would not use Benadryl and observe. He also tells me on every visit that almost all of the cases where someone had a reaction, used the Epi and still died, it was because the Epi was used more than 30 minutes after the reaction started. I am not saying it is okay to wait 29 minutes after the reaction starts before using the Epi, just saying that using Benadryl watching things get better then worse, can waste those precious 30 minutes. Having already used the Epi, I would be afraid to give antihistamine and observe. Too chancy for me.

[This message has been edited by Carefulmom (edited September 28, 2003).]

Groups: None
By Peg541 on Sun, 09-28-03, 15:52

My feelings exactly Carefulmom.

Epi pen STOPS the reaction in it's tracks and gives you time to call 911 and make it to the hospital.

Epi pen does not cure a reaction, it just halts it for awhile.

I say this so often I am sorry to repeat myself again. I read that most kids die because some adult has decided to "wait and see." Holding off the epi pen because of their own fear or whatever.

A peanut allergy in any form is a deadly allergy. Period. It is not going to get any better, ever. Sometimes the reactions are cumulative meaning the next one is stronger and faster than the previous, and on and on.

Our son had been given permission when he was as young as 10 to override the decision of any adult. Use your epi pen and call 911 no matter what the adults around you say.

Peggy

__________________

Peggy

Son 22 Allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, tomatoes, soy, milk, oats, fish.

Groups: None
By Carefulmom on Sun, 09-28-03, 16:55

Plus once you have used it and seen your child completely fine within 60 seconds, it seems pointless to try something else instead next time that may or may not work, and at best will take awhile. It is very striking how quickly the Epi works.

Groups: None
By Peg541 on Sun, 09-28-03, 17:16

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

__________________

Peggy

Son 22 Allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, tomatoes, soy, milk, oats, fish.

Groups: None
By pjama0502 on Sun, 09-28-03, 17:43

Thank you, thank you, thank you.

Very good advice indeed!

Jen

Groups: None
By Peg541 on Sun, 09-28-03, 18:02

Jen,

Thank YOU for being so gracious and letting us go on and on. Especially me.

My PA son is 18 and away at college for the first time. I only found this site last December. I was on my own for 17 years.

I wish I had a place like this way back then. You'll get lots of good stuff here.

Peggy

__________________

Peggy

Son 22 Allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, tomatoes, soy, milk, oats, fish.

Groups: None
By StaceyK on Mon, 09-29-03, 12:29

I have to say, that my aboved posted ER plan does NOT meet with the approval of my allergist, who says you should wait the longest possible time to use the Epi Pen - even, he says, on the way to the ER in the car if your child "really" starts to collapse. I think he's crazy - no one else says that - so I go by the Food Allergy support group's sponsoring doctor in my area, who is also the one who gave the food allergy seminar. Needless to say, I'm shopping for a new allergist.

Groups: None
By momofjen on Mon, 09-29-03, 13:59

What if the reaction is in the form of a few hives and to your knowledge, no peanut /nut products were ingested? My dd use to come up with one or two mystery hives around her mouth for no apparent reason. I always gave her benedryl, and watched her closely. Am I wrong to do that.? Allergist said that was the right thing. Should she have epijr. in that case?

Groups: None
By attlun on Mon, 09-29-03, 15:02

I would not give epi in that case, unless further symptoms developed. That is just my own opinion based upon our experience.

------------------
Tina
Trevor 8/6/01
Harmony 1/22/03

__________________

*Tina
Trevor-4, PA
Harmony-3, NKA
Trace-21 months, KNA

Groups: None
By Kim M on Mon, 09-29-03, 18:29

I agree with what Carefulmom and Peg have said here about NOT waiting until there is obvious breathing difficulty before using the Epipen. I asked the first allergist we had the question, and his response was if there are truly ONLY hives, give Benadryl, but if there is any swelling at all, it means there are at least two organ systems involved, and use the Epipen immediately. I can't believe the allergist who says to wait as long as possible. That is absolutely insane, especially in light of some reports that the Epipen fails anyway in up to 10% of cases. I would imagine that waiting greatly increases the chance of the Epipen not doing the job. If there is known ingestion, I would agree that it's probably a good idea to use the Epipen regardless of what the symptoms are.

Groups: None
By Peg541 on Tue, 09-30-03, 01:40

And a few hives seem OK but that might mean there are also a TON of hives on the inside of the airway.

Peg

__________________

Peggy

Son 22 Allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, tomatoes, soy, milk, oats, fish.

Groups: None
By abbylukesmom on Sat, 10-18-03, 03:07

Gosh! After reading these postings I am sitting here with tears in my eyes thanking God for my son! It's a long Hx, but I'll sum it up........he has reactive airway disease & is also allergic to all dairy products......he turned 2 in June...he had never had any trouble with peanuts, but, for some reason, I became suspicious of them...I would not feed him anymore peanut products...In July he had one tiny bite of a peanut butter cracker that my FIL gave him-he refused to eat anymore. About 45 minutes later he was in his stroller (we were shopping) I looked over at him & he was unconscious & blue. I screamed for help & someone had laid him on the ground & was going to give him CPR. His eyes then fluttered open, but he was extremely lethargic, he remained that way for over 3 hours. The hospital kept him for observation because every test they ran came back normal. During the night he had a grand mal seizure-it was horrifing! He was hooked up to monitors & I remember looking at his heart rate, it was 0...like something you see on tv.....my husband has a cousin with a PA son, she told me they will run all the tests & will find nothing because it is a PA. She was right!!
In retrospect my DS has had another episode a month before, while he was sleeping. I heard him fall out of bed & when I went to check on him I couldn't rouse him. I checked his vitals & they were fine. I brushed it off as him being tired. But after the shopping episode I thought back & remembered when had went to dinner at one of those places that serve peanuts on the tables that day & my DS had eaten only 1 peanut & broke out with one hive on his face!Now it all makes sense!
I had him allergy tested & it was negative to both a skin test & a rast test-which is crazy! He broke out with hives on every extremity after eating only a few plain m&m's last month. Last week he got ahold of a chocolate mint cookie & it gave him hives. Now I am paranoid about everywhere we go & everything he eats! After reading the above posting I know my son has had his guardian angel working overtime! He is on zyrtec daily & I have an epi pen, but now I definately want to get another one!
I have been looking at alot of PA sites and there's one that says sometimes their isn't hives-just a collapse-that reminded me of my son.
Thanks for everyone's postings here-it has taught me alot! I will definately not be afraid to use the epi pen!

Groups: None
By redtruck on Sun, 10-19-03, 17:52

Let me preface by saying that in 4 yrs since my dd has been diagnosed pa,we have never had to use an epi. On a couple of occassions she has thrown up...now is that from a possible pn/tn ingestion or just something didnt agree with her stomach as with us adults from time to time...not certain.
However, we decided long ago not to use benedryl since we were told by our allergist (and this makes sense to us) that it can mask some symptons of an allergic reation, thus delaying our use of an epi or getting her to hospital, much like an asperin will mask the symptons of a headache. And we definately don't want to mask any symptons like hives, swelling etc, in case they grow into larger ones or more of them etc. So we gave up our benedryl and carry only the epis.

Groups: None
By Carefulmom on Sun, 10-19-03, 20:41

I`m with Redtruck. The only time I ever use the Zyrtec is if dd has insect bites which itch a lot and I only use it if I am sure it is insect bites. About the hives only, I did notice dd had one hive when I picked her up a few months ago, and I did not use the epi. I watched and within 20 minutes it was gone. I have no idea what it was due to.

To abbylukesmom, just wondering if your child was on Zyrtec when the skin and rast tests came out negative? If so, can zyrtec give you a false negative?

Groups: None
By deegann on Sun, 10-19-03, 22:36

.

[This message has been edited by deegann (edited March 15, 2004).]

Groups: None
By abbylukesmom on Sun, 10-19-03, 23:39

Carefulmom,
Well, he did have the zyrtec with the RAST test, but not with the skin test. I am not sure if it would give a false negative. I will have him retested in July to see what it shows then.
I have another question, maybe you can answer it: I have noticed on several occasions that when I am rocking him to sleep at night (he's my last baby-hard to give it up) that he scratchs the palms of his hands alot & his arms too. There are no visible hives, but he really tries to dig into them. It's not everynight-just occasionally. He does take the zyrtec every day-could it be he's been exposed to some peanut traces & the zyrtec is helping mask the symptoms? These are the nights that I usually sleep with him, because I worry so much! Any ideas?

[This message has been edited by abbylukesmom (edited October 19, 2003).]

Groups: None
By Carefulmom on Mon, 10-20-03, 04:06

Abbylukesmom, if he is allergic to dairy, are you eliminating all milk from his diet? (meaning reading all labels, etc.) I am asking because I am thinking a chocolate mint cookie would have milk in it? If you are not reading all labels for milk (including casein and whey which are parts of milk protein), I am thinking maybe the itching is due to milk ingredients in something he is eating? It is hard to know because he is on Zyrtec daily, so we don`t really know if he would have hives with his itching if he were not on Zyrtec, so it is hard to know if the itching is allergic or something else. If he really isn`t on anything with milk ingredients (my dd is also allergic to milk so I know how many kinds of cookies have to be excluded from their diet), then maybe it is a variant of excema. Or, even though this is way off topic, but when my dd had scabies, she itched at night on her hands and feet tons. There wasn`t much rash, just scratches where she had been scratching herself. Seems like if it were scabies it would be every night though. Anyhow, it is hard to know what is going on with him on Zyrtec daily. What is the reason for the daily Zyrtec? Somehow, it just doesn`t feel right to me---if my child were needing Zyrtec daily I would want to know why. About the skin test, I remember my allergist telling me around age 2 that sometimes the immune system is not developed enough at that age to give a postive skin test. I remember my dd tested positive to milk and negative to soy, but to me she appeared to be allergic to soy. That was how it came up. He said to stop giving soy, because she was so young that she might not yet have a positive skin test to soy. She never had a rast, but a CAP RAST is supposed to be very accurate (although I don`t know if it is accurate at age 2). Maybe he should have a CAP RAST. If it is positive then you will know for sure, if it is negative I am not sure how much that will help. Here is what I would do. When he has a night where he is itching, assuming you are reading all labels for milk already, write down everything he had within the last few hours when he is itching. Maybe if you write it down, you will find something that he always has right before he is itching. Obviously I am assuming that you are already reading all labels for peanut and "may contain", shared equipment with peanuts, etc.

Groups: None
By abbylukesmom on Mon, 10-20-03, 04:48

Carefulmom
I should confess that sometimes I have been too lenient with the dairy products. I never give him milk, cheese, yogurt, etc, but occasionally a chocolate cookie here a couple cheese crackers there. I have definately been more careful since his reaction to the may contain peanut traces chocolate cookie last week. You have brought up a good point-it may be the dairy. His usual reaction to dairy is belly aches, diarrhea, & chroinc coughing w/vomiting (asmathic). But, from reading so many of these postings the past few weeks I understand how reaction can change at any time! How could I be so stupid! When we first discovered his milk allergy (he tested negative on that too) he was on four different meds daily trying to control the reactive airway disease (RAD). After we took away dairy products we weaned him off all of his meds except zyrtec prn. He has seasonal allergies so that is why he is taking it daily. We live in the Ohio River Valley which is known for being one of the worst places in the U.S. for allergies. Fall & winter is the prime time for RAD his allergist said to keep him on the zyrtec until a good hard frost hits. Anyway...sorry to babble....he does have a little runny nose now & some eczema acting up too. I used to keep a food diary for him-I will start it back up tomorrow & I will definately be vigilant! Thanks so much for your imput!

No one has told me that a 2 year old's immune system may not be developed enough to test positive to the allergens. It sounds like you have a great allergist. I should start looking for another one because he certainly never told me that! What else is your child allergic to?
I have been label reading-when we first found out about the dairy I made a card with all the other wording that meant milk & carried it with me everywhere!
p.s. If you have any special recipes that you would like to share I would love them! He is also allergic to soy-we use rice milk!

[This message has been edited by abbylukesmom (edited October 20, 2003).]

[This message has been edited by abbylukesmom (edited October 20, 2003).]

Groups: None
By Carefulmom on Mon, 10-20-03, 16:08

Abbylukesmom, no time for a long post because I am at work, but I just wanted to say don`t feel bad that you have not been reading labels every single time for milk. I only knew to do it because our allergist told me to. My dd is 8 and is allergic to milk, eggs, and peanuts. She outgrew the soy allergy. Her milk reactions also changed with time---first it was blood in stool, diarrhea, crying non stop (probably due to abdominal pain), as she got older it became nasal symptoms and wheezing. Anyhow, don`t feel bad about the past, but I do think you should read every label and eliminate all dairy from his diet. I know that my dd`s last milk reaction was from a product mislabeled, but it didn`t have much milk in it, and all she got was nasal symptoms (she sneezed for 20 minutes straight and got a very stuffy nose). The point is that these trace amounts of milk in some kids can still cause symptoms (and by the way it looked like hay fever but I believe it was a milk reaction). And yes, our allergist is great. I never would have known to look for casein or whey on the label. He is the one who gave me the epi. I never thought I would be using it, and when the moment came (first time she had egg), I was so glad I had it. More later, have to run. Oh, one last thing, if your child has not had egg yet, I would wait. If he has had egg and is okay, then don`t worry about it. Any chance his symptoms are due to egg? That is a pretty common allergen in toddlers.

Groups: None
By abbylukesmom on Tue, 10-21-03, 01:53

Carefulmom,
Yes, he has eaten eggs-several times. As far as I can tell he is fine with them. I don't let him eat fish or shrimp-I want to wait until he is retested just to be safe! I have began his food diary today. Thanks for your advice! You've been a great help!

Groups: None
By Soapy Jo on Wed, 10-22-03, 03:59

My 3 1/2 ds (PNA/TNA) CAP RAst 15/100 has had three reactions: the initial to an accidental bite of PB at 14 mos; second to bread in freezer that escaped our clearout following the diagnosis (a may contain); third this summer with a plain hamburger bun from an in-store bakery not labeled for cross-contamination (stupid, stupid on my part!) Each time his got face a little rashy and one eye got itchy and started to swell up. We have only given him Benadryl, watched and were prepared to give Epi -- except the inital when we didn't have it. He didn't have any breathing problem or wheezing (otherwise I would've given epi right away). The posts make me worry about waiting on the Epi, but in our experience (maybe very lucky!) Benadryl has done the trick. I am going to ask my allergist (who is very good and publishes on pa)for exact instructions.

The other question Chris at pa.com asked when I registered was "how long would you wait after giving the first epi to give the second one". I didn't really know. I know they work quickly and if it didn't work in like a couple minutes, I'd give it again. Does anyone have a better answer to this?

I know this is in many other threads too but just to remind other new people to carry two epi's and make sure they are from different Lots just in case.

Groups: None
By Carefulmom on Fri, 10-24-03, 03:57

Abbylukesmom, finally back to finish my post. You asked about recipes. Between milk, eggs, and peanut allergy, it is hard to find ones that taste like anything real. I have a great chocolate cake recipe---I re-raised the thread. It is in the thread about Duncan Hines. It definitely does not taste like anything is missing. Cookies that are without milk are hard to find. Some packages of chocolate mini-oreos are milk free, but some packages that look exactly the same do have milk, so you still have to read the ingredients on each pack. Plain oreos have milk, but uh-oh oreos are milk free. These are all made in a peanut free plant. However, they do have soybean oil, so I don`t know if that is a problem for your child`s soy allergy. Mine outgrew the soy allergy before this came up. If you followed a strict diet of milk/peanut/tree nut avoidance, I wonder if you could get your child off zyrtec. It is hard to know. Interesting that he was on four allergy meds, and it went down to one when he was diagnosed with milk allergy. My dd also has environmental allergies, but she is very well controlled on a nasal inhaler and a mouth inhaler. She has been on these daily for years. It has really cut way down on the asthma attacks. Let us know how it goes with the food diary and also how his symptoms are on strict milk avoidance.

P.S. Does anyone know why it is so hard to change our posts in the middle now? In order to change it, we now have to submit it and then go back and edit it. A few other people have commented on this. Does anyone know why this is happening?

[This message has been edited by Carefulmom (edited October 24, 2003).]

Groups: None
By deegann on Fri, 10-24-03, 20:23

.

[This message has been edited by deegann (edited March 15, 2004).]

Groups: None
By Carefulmom on Fri, 10-24-03, 20:58

Sorry about that---I didn`t say anything because I already addressed that in my post above (Sept 28 11:27 A.M.). I didn`t want to be repetitive. Our allergist said not to. The reason he said is because the hives can resolve but the blood pressure can still be dropping. By giving Benadryl and then waiting to see if things will get better, you are losing time, and if the Epi is used too late it may not work. That is why Nathan died. Sorry to repeat. If my daughter had more than a few hives, I would use epi rather than take a chance on losing too much time and having the epi not work. When I used it, it worked within 60 seconds or less.

Groups: None
By deegann on Thu, 11-06-03, 23:31

.

[This message has been edited by deegann (edited February 09, 2005).]

Groups: None
By momjd on Fri, 11-07-03, 02:34

Benadryl may stop additional histamines from being released by the mast cells. BUT, if the histamine has already activated the reaction then it can't stop that activity. The histamines themselves don't do all the bad stuff, they travel out to other cells and tell them what to do- kind of a chain reaction. The impact of bendryl is basically to try to halt more histamines from joining the fray. That's why some doctors recommend a daily dose of antihistamine to keep it in the body's system at all times. (We do this b/c of environmental allergens). So for example, taking the benadryl after an exposure to pollen helps me a little, but I'm much better off if I've taken in advance of going outside.

I think even the epi doesn't actually stop the chain reaction so much as it counteracts their effects. That's why even with benadryl and epi, you still need to go to the ER. The meds can't stop the reaction permanently. You might get lucky and have it subside on it's own while the meds are working, but they really are only a stop-gap measure.

So basically, each medicine is working on a different stage of the reaction and once you start seeing systematic stuff- you are past the 'just stop the histamines' stage.

Again, that's just the impression that I've gotten reading here and there. You probably should talk to your doctor to get a clear directive as to when and under what circumstances the epi should be used.

[This message has been edited by momjd (edited November 06, 2003).]

Groups: None
By momjd on Fri, 11-07-03, 02:49

Found this link that might offer additional insight:
[url="http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~aair/anaphylaxis.htm#SEC3"]http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~aair/anaphylaxis.htm#SEC3[/url]

Groups: None
By deegann on Sat, 11-08-03, 02:11

.

[This message has been edited by deegann (edited March 15, 2004).]

Groups: None
By Carefulmom on Wed, 01-07-04, 02:26

Reraising for joao.

Groups: None
By Joao on Wed, 01-07-04, 05:34

Thanks Carefulmom.

Ps: love the alias [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

Groups: None
By ~logansmom~ on Wed, 01-07-04, 17:44

abbylukesmom,

Your post caught my attention because my PA son sometimes scratches the palms of his hands until they are really red.....He used to have eczema, before we knew about PA and eliminated peanuts or may contains completely from our lives but I wonder what is causing his palms (only) to be so itchy, I do notice that they get really dry, I wonder if it's from the scratching, the dry air or something else, we started using a humidifer, it helps a little....we originally got it for his almost nightly nosebleeds (whole other thing) but , the palms thing has me perplexed. Also wanted to mention that this thread is very helpful, I get confused about when to use the epi, we have never had to use it yet but it's my understanding that if given un-necessarily that it cant hurt them....but if not given , it could end up killing them.
Thanks,
Lisa

Groups: None
By Carefulmom on Tue, 06-29-04, 14:23

Reraising for saknjmom.

Groups: None

Peanut Free and Nut Free Directory

Peanut-Free/Nut-Free Directory

Our directory is intended as a resource for people with peanut and nut allergies. It contains foods, helpful products, and much more.

Subscribe today and receive a handy one-page guide to peanut-free snacks!

Sign up for our free newsletter and stay on top of your Peanut Allergy

Email

PeanutAllergy.com Social