Article on vaccinations and allergy in children

8 replies [Last post]
By Danielle on Mon, 12-29-03, 20:00

Do vaccinations make children allergic?
Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients, Nov, 2001, by Alan R. Gaby

The association of DTP or tetanus vaccination with allergies and allergy-related respiratory symptoms was assessed among 13,944 U.S. children and adolescents (aged 2 months to 16 years) participating in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The odds of having a history of asthma was twice as great among vaccinated children as among unvaccinated children (adjusted odds ratio = 2.00; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.59-6.74). The odds of having had any allergy-related respiratory symptom in the past 12 months was 63% greater among vaccinated than unvaccinated children (adjusted odds ratio = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.05-2.54).

Comment: The prevalence of allergic disorders has increased by 50-100% among adults and more than doubled among children during the past 20 years. While there are many possible explanations for this increase (such as more pollution and more additives in our food) widespread use of vaccinations may also be a contributing factor, Animal and human studies have shown that DTP and tetanus vaccinations induce allergic responses. While there is still no proof that vaccinations make people allergic, it is important to weigh all of the potential risks and benefits when making public-health and personal decisions about vaccination.

Hurwitz EL, et al. Effects of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis or tetanus vaccination an allergies and allergy-related respiratory symptoms among children and adolescents in the United States. J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2000;23:81-90.

COPYRIGHT 2001 The Townsend Letter Group
COPYRIGHT 2001 Gale Group

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By Love my C on Mon, 12-29-03, 22:58

Thanks for posting this, Danielle. I read another post this year from someone here that the Pertussis vaccine raises IGE levels. I printed out the study from that and took it with me to my son's 5 yrs. Dr. visit as I wanted him to forego that vaccine. I expected a reluctant attitutde from the ped., but she agreed with me. My ds has mulitple food allergies, even more w/in the last couple of years and the last thing I thought he needed was his IGE levels raised.

He is still due for his DT vaccine as they were out of them at the time of the visit. I wasn't aware of a danger with those also, but it sounds like that may be the case?

Are you foregoing vaccines for your children?

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By Danielle on Tue, 12-30-03, 00:01

Are you foregoing vaccines for your children?

I have my children vaccinated. I was very careful with my PA DD even before the allergy but I am extrememly careful with my 1 year old. I found a new pediatrician that lets me space the shots at least 1 month apart or longer if the vaccine label stated it must be longer in between shots. Funny how you can have the shot on the same day but if you don't you must wait a certain amount of time for the next shot. I don't vaccinate when they have even a slight cold and I do not introduce a new food that week. I will always beleive in my heart that my PA DD's immune system was shot from RSV/pneumonia and couldn't handle the peanut. Might not be the whole reason but I think contributed. I am totally in a dilemma about the DTAP or DTP. OUr Doc said she would leave it to me to make the decision but pertussis is definitely out there and usually found in adults. SCary but the allergy and food intolerances that I am dealing with scare me more I think. I will have to think some more but for now I am waiting on it until her 18 month appointment.

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By Jennifer1970 on Tue, 12-30-03, 00:26

Try [url="http://www.909shot.com"]www.909shot.com[/url] or
[url="http://www.vaclib.org"]www.vaclib.org[/url]

I find it very interesting that the medical community insists that children with lowered immune systems ( such as those with asthma/allergies) get shots , but the drug makers say those people are at greater risk for ill effects.

Check out the ingredient list. That'll have your head spinning for sure.

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By momjd on Tue, 12-30-03, 02:39

My son has multiple food allergies and most likely a separate immune related digestive disease. So when my dd is born in January we will be delaying vaccinations.

I might add that the decision is easier for us to make only because our children won't be in daycare or participate in other activities where exposure to illness is likely. DH and I had all our vaccinations, DS was fully vaccinated so it will only be DD who is not and we probably will get her vaccinations eventually. I just think we should wait until we see what HER body's immune system is like rather than relying on studies that examine the responses of normal immune systems.

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By BENSMOM on Tue, 12-30-03, 04:11

Danielle, for what it's worth, my pediatrician said that pertussis is not so dangerous in children over 2. By then they can fight it off pretty well. I vaccinated for pertussis UNTIL they were 2, then skipped that one. If you're waiting until 18 months anyway, you might just want to forgo it altogether. See what your pediatrician agrees with what mine said.

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By on Tue, 12-30-03, 04:53

Are vaccinations different than they were 40 years ago? Or was I even vaccinated against measles, mumps and rubella because I know I contracted all three and not mild cases.

The support group in my area, apparently all of the members believe that something was *wrong* with the batch of vaccinations in a particular year because all of their children are the same age.

I'm not willing to pinpoint PA on one cause alone. Just as I'm not willing to accept the eating pb while pregnant and breastfeeding theory alone either (simply because I was one of those people that didn't eat pb or copious amounts of any peanut products).

Stupid question, but simply because I don't feel like going downstairs to check my purse to see when my children were vaccinated. What age do we start vaccinating our children at? Did *most* of our children develop PA or have their first PA reaction after their first vaccination, second, or third?

I also know just within the last day, I looked at the notice again that I had received from Public Health here, through the school, that my daughter required her 5 year old shots (whatever they include) before she could remain in school.

I've had both children vaccinated. I've also had them vaccinated for chicken pox.

The one shot that I'm not clear about, and it has nothing to do with PA, is the Hepatitis vaccination that is given in our schools when children are 12. I saw a horrible show on Dateline (or something like it) about the effects of that particular vaccine.

Does anyone remember being tested for tuberculosis? I can't remember the circumstances, but when I was quite young, I had to go for TB testing and I remember only because the mark the test left on my arm resembled the old rotary phone number slots.

This has me thinking. I will try to check both children's vaccine cards to see when they had their first round of shots and each subsequent series.

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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By Jennifer1970 on Tue, 12-30-03, 17:36

They've started vaccinating children at two days old. Yes , 48hrs. HebB. They recieve their first series of shots at 8weeks.

In the hospital I denied the HebB , silver nitrate and heel stick for my daughter. She was a healthy infant with no troubles at all until her shots at two months.

She's been sick ever since with deep dark circles under her eyes (a sign of liver damage) and she has multiple food allergies.

In Europe they don't vaccinate until the child is two years old. At all. Their children have much lower rates of allergies and food allergies and asthma.

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By KayMarks on Tue, 12-07-04, 01:10

raising for MMCUVA

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