Are any jobs off limits for PA people?

32 replies [Last post]
By maryann221 on Wed, 11-12-03, 19:53

My TN/PA son is only 7, but I worry about the future of course. I expect jobs in the food service industry would be dangerous for him (either in fast food or waiting tables). Are their any other jobs that would be dangerous for him~I'm thinking about when he's a teen and eager to earn a few extra bucks.

Thanks~I haven't posted here in a long time.

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MaryAnn

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By on Wed, 11-12-03, 22:58

Hi Maryann,

I would think the only problem might be where employees eat lunch. As an adult with pa I don't worry about peanut residue on table etc., the way a parent would worry about their child (in school) as it's very different. Not as many adults eat pb all the time, and (we can only hope) they are a little cleaner.

However, some people seem to have some difficulties in smaller offices, where people are using microwaves, especially if they are smell reactive. That might not be a problem if you live in a warmer climate where there is always the option of eating outdoors.

BTW, I am considering looking for a part-time job next fall. So far, I'm thinking about applying at a grocery store, either customer service or check-out. (Not the bakery or any department right next to it.) I honestly don't think this will cause me any problems, but, if my allergies force me to quit I'll be sure to post here because I think it is important for people to know if their (or their child's) options might be limited.

Hmmm! Getting a bit ahead of myself. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/redface.gif[/img] Just assuming I'll get the job if I apply. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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By Syd's Mom on Thu, 11-13-03, 03:58

This is an excellent question - one I question myself all the time when looking towards a future for my DD. A couple of jobs that I had when younger - may be difficult for a PA person, specifically:
[b]Lifeguarding[/b] - direct mouth to mouth AR (artifical respiration) used in both rescue breathing for drowning and during CPR applications would be very risky - few if any guard kits include "spacers" (a plastic tube like device with open mouth guards at each end, creating a space between mouths)which can help reduce the risk of direct mouth to mouth AR, but do not eliminate the risk altogether.
[b]Swim Instruction[/b] - again - in the teaching application of direct AR - (this one could be modified with the use of "ressa-annie's" [b]providing they are completely cleaned and sanitized before each use [/b] or having another instructor take over this section of training, but rescue breathing (AR) is taught at intermediate levels and with a pool full of intermediate level swimmer there is never enough ressa-annie's to go around, so the "swapping around" of instructors would be the more viable solution. I still want to see this as a viable job for a PA/FA person.

and although I have no experience in these professions, I've always felt these ones were rather risky being PA/TNA:

[b]Pilot/On-flight Crew [/b] - on those airlines that insist peanuts be served, eaten, scattered and smushed into the carpeting/seats (yuck!) - but the airlines that are peanut free - it's a do-able career if the airline restricts "carry-on" nuts.
(lol)

[b]CruiseLine Crew member[/b] - where access to a hospital (with extended facilities that exceed the cruiseliners medical facilities) can only be made via emergency airlift or whenever the "boat" reaches the next port.

hmmm, also thinking about Corrections Officers should the inmates find out that one is PA? Wow - this thread is going to have me thinking for quite some time.

[This message has been edited by Syd's Mom (edited November 12, 2003).]

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By StaceyK on Thu, 11-13-03, 12:33

I'm not sure the military is an option...seems I read that food allergies are disqualifiers...anyone else know for sure?

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By on Thu, 11-13-03, 15:04

Regarding the military, I'm not sure if it would be a disqualifier, but I would think yes. The risk of not being able to get safe food and not being able to get quick medical care would be a deadly combination.

Both my kids work as lifeguards/swim instructors. The oldest (allergies to penicillin, latex, possibly banana) might be going back to college to train as a paramedic, which is also a risky job for people with food allergies.

A few years ago one of my sons had a co-worker who had anaphylactic reactions to kiwi. It was an outdoor pool, and customers were allowed to bring in food to eat, but employees were not allowed to bring kiwi so the staff lunch area was safe. The lifeguard with the allergy had only one restriction to doing her job, she was not required to clean up the area at the end of the day because of the risk of touching kiwi residue. The guard kits did include what I guess is the spacers Syd's Mom mentioned. It only lets the air go one way, to the patient, to prevent the lifesaver from getting vomitted on. (yuck!)

What about fireman? How much risk there? Dealing with a restaurant fire could be risky, although with the proper fire safety equipment, maybe not.

***********

Which reminds me - I have some family members who work in fire safety and training. Part of the training involves going in to smoke houses. Years ago they used to use peanut oil, but, because of the increase in pa they are no longer using that.

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By erik on Thu, 11-13-03, 16:05

Many of you may be shocked to hear of a job I had during high school. I worked at a candy shop/ice cream parlour called "Laura Secord" (during part of the time that I worked for them, they were owned by Nestle Canada - presntly they are owned by Archibald Candy Company of the USA).

It was definitely not peanut-free. Not many of their products contained peanuts, although there was one chocolate piece that did (peanut clusters) and they also sold mixed nuts. Although back in the 1980s, the risk of airborne and cross-contamination was not as well known as as it is today, so I had no concerns on the job (although I was careful).

I did have a few reactions in the 1980s from cross-contamination (usually baked goods.. marzipan on a birthday cake, a Danish pastry), but I never did have a reaction at Laura Secord in 5 years. As it was a food services establishment, frequent hand washing was mandatory so this would have helped to prevent any potential reaction (re- residue concerns).

So knowing what I know now, this would not have been a good place to work. But I did enjoy the job however (surrounded by chocolate and ice cream).

(note: Laura Secord products are currently labelled as 'may contain traces of nuts/peanuts')

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By CorinneM1 on Sat, 11-22-03, 12:52

My husband is a firefighter in Chicago, and I know that he works with guys that have other food allergies (milk/wheat/egg). I will ask him about a PA allergy though and get his opinion if this would effect hiring or a job.

They, like your children who are lifeguards, have the tubes that they use while adminstering CPR, and anytime there is a possibility of body fluids or saliva, they double up on their gloves. And on that note, they have non-latex gloves as an option for those that have this allergy.

The only way that I could see this being an issue is at meal time. The cook their own meals and whoever is in charge of cooking that day, does the shopping. For the guys that have the egg/wheat/milk allergies, they often bring in their own food, or provide a list of food items that they will need for the day and then prepare their own meals if the day's menu won't work for them.

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By MommaBear on Sat, 11-22-03, 16:20

Quote:Originally posted by CorinneM1:
[b]My husband is a firefighter in Chicago, and I know that he works with guys that have other food allergies (milk/wheat/egg). I will ask him about a PA allergy though and get his opinion if this would effect hiring or a job.

They, like your children who are lifeguards, have the tubes that they use while adminstering CPR, and anytime there is a possibility of body fluids or saliva, they double up on their gloves. And on that note, they have non-latex gloves as an option for those that have this allergy.

[/b]

I agree. If one is exposed to food products from a patient, they probably aren't using [b]Universal Precautions[/b], and I would think that in addition to any food allergy, there would be more to worry about (in addition to food allergies).

I also think the profession Firefighter/Paramedic, [i]in itself[/i] carrys certain inherent risks. Minimized through the judicious use of Policy, Procedure, Protocol, and Standard Operating Procedures, as well as Standards of Care. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Does Chicago Fire Department now require everyone to be both? FireFighter/Paramedic?My husband works for a Chicagoland area Department. Thank you for a the well worded response, CorrineM1, as I was searching for the words myself.

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By david_pe on Thu, 06-17-10, 09:16

I think, most importantly, do not get frustrated by failure. Many teens give up after applying to 10 or 12 jobs, concluding that "no one is hiring teens this summer." Chances are good that there are more than 10 or 12 employers in your city or town, so it is necessary to cast a wider net. There are many summer jobs for 15 year olds opportunities outside the confines of the local mall.

John A. Challenger is chief executive officer of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc., the global-outplacement consultancy that pioneered outplacement as an employer-paid benefit in the 1960s. Challenger is a recognized thought leader on workplace, labor, and economic issues.

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By Claire on Sat, 11-22-03, 21:17

I think my son has a terrible job for an allergic child,but i don't like frightening him all the time. He works at a grocery store,packing food and putting carts away. Neating up and such. I just hope and pray i have taught him well enough everyday.
He loves working and i certainly have to incourage that.
I think dish washer would be a bad job for an alleric child, Also Ice cream shops.
To bad our kids can not all get together and open their own safe shops to work at and be with each other safely.
We have to worry but the secret is not letting them know it all the time.

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Claire E Allen

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By Ellie on Wed, 12-03-03, 17:06

This is my first day on this network, and my first post...

I am an adult with PA, acquired suddenly for the first time when I was 27 years old (8 years ago).

As far as jobs, most employers I have found to be very accommodating. And, most co-workers are as well.

I used to work for a company that served huge peanut butter cookies in the cafeteria. The cookie smell was nauseating. After about six months, I politely asked HR about it, and the cookies were immediately eliminated.

Some people griped about the lack of bp cookies (which were replaced with sugar cookies), but all were very understanding when they found out the reason for the change. In fact, some of my coworkers even took it upon themselves to warn new employees that they were not to bring "peanut" snacks to work.

I would imagine the absolute worst job would be working in one of the bars/restaruants where people throw peanut shells on the floor and trample on them.

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By CorinneM1 on Wed, 12-03-03, 17:13

Actually my husband (the firefighter) stated that they never do mouth to mouth any longer. They use a bag.

And he did not think that peanut allergies would pose a problem and most houses will accommodate someone with special needs/food requests.

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By CorinneM1 on Wed, 12-03-03, 17:18

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b] I agree. If one is exposed to food products from a patient, they probably aren't using [b]Universal Precautions[/b], and I would think that in addition to any food allergy, there would be more to worry about (in addition to food allergies).

I also think the profession Firefighter/Paramedic, [i]in itself[/i] carrys certain inherent risks. Minimized through the judicious use of Policy, Procedure, Protocol, and Standard Operating Procedures, as well as Standards of Care. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

[b][quote]Does Chicago Fire Department now require everyone to be both? FireFighter/Paramedic?My husband works for a Chicagoland area Department.

[/b]

They recently changed their policies in the last five years. Before you were either a firefighter or a paramedic. There was an option to become a firefighter/EMT (which he is) for a slight increase in pay. Now it is required that all firefighters also have EMT training out of the academy. My husband works on a ALS (advanced life support) engine, and there are BLS (basic life support) engines now as well to aid relief to the ambulance.

Also, just starting a few months ago, he also takes the ambulance I think, once or twice a month. But he is not considered a paramedic, just an EMT.

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By Heather2 on Wed, 12-03-03, 18:24

Claire...Wasn't your son doing landscaping? Was that just seasonal? I guess I just thought it would be year round with leaves and then snow. I thought that was a good job.

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By maryann221 on Wed, 12-03-03, 18:50

Thank you all for your feedback. I thought restaurants would be a problem~but EMT's and lifeguards never entered my mind.

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MaryAnn

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By Syd's Mom on Wed, 12-03-03, 19:24

maryann221: After having read AnnaMaries comments that her kids both guarded and instructed in aquatics (which I found were great jobs to have from high school thru Univerity - both during the summer & off season), I am not going to discourage Syd in the slightest if she wants to guard - I didn't have as much of a worry about her wanting to teach aquatics - I was hesitant about the possibility of her wanting to guard like I did. I know I'll simply buy her a personal spacer to be clipped to her breakaway chain she'll be wearing with a whistle anyways. Back when I was guarding, ACLS was becoming standard along with NLS in guarding but now I'm noticing defibulator machines in guarding offices(all we ever had was freeflow O2) - our local skating arenas has their own defib machines for the zamboni drivers who are trained in their proper use -makes me wonder why anyone would think using an epi pen was overly complicated - if a commoner like me or the local zamboni driver can learn how to effectively use a defib machine - it's doesn't require rocket science to master the epi pen.

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By Claire on Thu, 12-04-03, 01:45

Heather Chris has been working Grocery store for 1 year now. The landscaping became a real big problem for him. The people were actually expecting him to watch after their own kids while he was there. The little dog they had attacked him everyday, and it was run by family and they would argue in front of him and scold the children and it was no longer a good job for a teenager. He can listen to me reprimand children. He is with kids his age and he actully loves what he does. He also wasn't getting any extra pay at the landscaping for all the extra jobs he was actually doing.
Now i have him driving and working around food. I guess we never get over any worrying do we? take care Claire

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Claire E Allen

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By becca on Thu, 12-04-03, 04:05

I also worked in an ice cream store, and it was very busy(which means it gets very messy). I am not allergic, but hav eoften thought that would not be a good job for my dd! Nuts in ice creams, nuts for toppings, at the very least.

Erik, did you eat the non-nut containing items back in those days, such as chocolate ice cream or vanilla? You say they not label for cross contact. Just curious, and if you were okay?

Babysitting concerns me as there is little control over another family and the cleanliness and I fear my dd being asked to serve PB to her charges. But I suppose it could be managed, much like I manage her visits to homes now. Or, she could deal with it for herself at that point(hopefully). But a concern.

Candy shop not the greatest either. becca

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By on Thu, 12-04-03, 16:11

Quote:Originally posted by becca:
[b]Babysitting concerns me as there is little control over another family and the cleanliness and I fear my dd being asked to serve PB to her charges. But I suppose it could be managed, much like I manage her visits to homes now. Or, she could deal with it for herself at that point(hopefully). But a concern.
[/b]

After my allergies (peanut and sesame seed) developed I started working in a school lunchroom as a supervisor. This included helping little ones opening their lunch and cleaning up the tables after they finished eating. (there was no peanut ban at that school at that time)

I don't react to touch/smell and never had a reaction at the school. And the only time I felt I couldn't do what was required was when a little boy asked me to help him open a plastic package containing candy similar to peanut brittle, but with sesame seeds instead. I imagined all that sesame powder flying up in my face, and just refused to do it. I did find a teacher to open it for him.

Becca, I would hope that anyone your dd would babysit for would be understanding of her not being able to serve or clean up pb. After all, she can't take care of their children if she's incapacitated. And, if they don't understand that -- they aren't the kind of parents she would want to baby sit for. I really do believe she will find good families to babysit for (if she decides she wants to). [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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By Rae on Thu, 12-11-03, 03:34

I know a high school age girl who got a job at a new restaurant in town (before they opened) called "Taste of Texas". When she entered the building on opening day for her first evening on the job, peanuts/peanut shells were all over the floor. She had to turn around and leave. She had never been to one of these chains and no one mentioned the peanuts in the hiring process.
Rachel

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By Tucker's mom on Tue, 12-16-03, 17:46

I always had dreams that my little boy would grow up to be a pro baseball player. Even if he turns out to have the ability, I don't think it would be a good choice for a pa person. We won't even take him to a ballpark because of the peanuts.

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By on Mon, 08-08-05, 01:14

Simply re-raising. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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By MommaBear on Mon, 08-08-05, 03:07

[url="http://www.sss.gov/QA.HTM#quest32"]http://www.sss.gov/QA.HTM#quest32[/url]

The link describes certain instances where probable exemptions (or not) pertaining to medical needs right on down to sex change. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] (U.S.)

General Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. I do not guarantee the accuracy, currentness, or content of the link in this post.

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By Codyman on Sat, 09-17-05, 20:52

For awhile now, my 8 year old PA DD has been thinking of what job she will have when she is older ~ High School age.

She had a list of jobs, but then slowly crossed some off like a cashier in grocery; cashier at the local corner store and working in a restaurant as she was worried about being exposed to peanuts.

Then she decide to go into business for herself. In the past few weeks, she has had a yard sale (twice I think), she and her brother almost had a vegetable sale (from veggies that they found in our neigbours compost pile ~ told her they probably weren't the freshest veggies and when they found a worm in a green bean they both agreed not to sell them). Her brother went off to play but DD was determined to set up shop today and decided to sell plants.

Hubby and I bought some for co-workers at a high price. I suggested she lower her price and sell more, thinking I would buy more for friends/family but then her business started booming. Just now, I had to dig up some more plants to replenish her stock.

DD said she likes to make money!!

[This message has been edited by Codyman (edited September 17, 2005).]

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By mommysamuels on Sun, 09-18-05, 14:50

Interesting thread, my husband is in the military (canadian so I don't know about the policy regarding food allergies in the US military).
He's allergic to Brazil nuts and is a cook; the only time it really makes me nervous is at Christmas time. There are always open containers of mixed nuts throughout the whole kitchen from Nov1st-Jan1st. He is extremely careful, and everyone is aware of his allergy/epipen.

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ds 18 months PNA, fish

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By Peg541 on Sun, 09-18-05, 15:20

My son is 20 and has had a few jobs but mostly working for his dad in the office.

I have always used his PA to show him how he has to work a bit harder and be a bit resourceful because he cannot do the kind of jobs that require him working with or around food.

Lots of kids line up for fast food jobs or grocery store jobs but that would not work for DS.

And their colleges have to know this in case they are work study students, many get jobs in the food service area.

Peg

[This message has been edited by Peg541 (edited September 18, 2005).]

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Peggy

Son 22 Allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, tomatoes, soy, milk, oats, fish.

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By Claire on Sun, 09-18-05, 16:29

Chris is having very bad luck with his job in a restaurant. He works at a pizza place that uses Peanut oil. Had a reaction a couple weeks ago that was not very pretty. He is just starting to feel better. He had no idea there was peanut oil there. I think he will get a different job now do to the fear of a reaction.
He could do construction,art,music, teaching, but I think the food is going to be tough. I didn't want to discourage him but he is finding all of this out on his own.
Having figured this out on his own will help him in his dealing as an adult.
Good luck claire

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Claire E Allen

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By KarenT on Sun, 09-18-05, 21:41

Claire do you live in Canada? Can't remember.
My DD works on cash at Canadian Tire. Some of her friends laugh at the fact that this pretty young lady works at a hardware store. She loves it.
When I went through the cash the other day I noticed that someone had put a magnet by the cash that said Peanut Free Zone. They have a special drawer at customer service with a label on the drawer that says her epi is in this drawer.
With work experience he should be able to get another job this time of year. Good luck.

------------------
Karalot

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Karalot

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By Peg541 on Sun, 09-18-05, 23:28

Quote:Originally posted by Claire:
[b]Chris is having very bad luck with his job in a restaurant. He works at a pizza place that uses Peanut oil. Had a reaction a couple weeks ago that was not very pretty. He is just starting to feel better. He had no idea there was peanut oil there. I think he will get a different job now do to the fear of a reaction.
He could do construction,art,music, teaching, but I think the food is going to be tough. I didn't want to discourage him but he is finding all of this out on his own.
Having figured this out on his own will help him in his dealing as an adult.
Good luck claire[/b]

Claire, do you mind talking about the reaction? What type and how was it treated?
I'm just interested to know so I'm sure my son has all of the information. You can use my email if you'd like.
Peggy

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Peggy

Son 22 Allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, tomatoes, soy, milk, oats, fish.

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By Kathy L. on Mon, 09-19-05, 14:10

Quote:Originally posted by Claire:
[b]Chris is having very bad luck with his job in a restaurant. He works at a pizza place that uses Peanut oil. [/b]

Claire - in addition to Peg's questions, maybe you can help me too. I live in N.J., a very Italian state, with pizza parlors on every corner. I have never come across any pizzeria that uses peanut oil. How is it used, and do you think it's a regional thing?

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By Claire on Mon, 09-19-05, 17:24

Kathy, the restaurant he works at right now here in NY is using peanut oil in their pizza, and in there salads. He doesn't have to make the salad and finally told the owners about his allergy.
There is a very interesting reason that chris decided not to tell about his allergy at work.
To make a long story short there was a kid that thought it would be cool to slip chris unsafe food so that they would have to rush him to the hospital and he would get out of work.
this is the one fear Chris has had all of his life. That a jerk will do something to him.
I know this but we never tell people of his fear because it would make him nervous around that person.
While on one hand he loves his job on the other he is frightened.
He really doesn't want to quit but we are thinking he may have to soon. He did have an airborne reaction about 2 weeks ago and is just starting to get his asthma under control now.
I have to let him be a young man but I would love to call the shots right now.
He now has a cell phone that we were finally able to afford for him. We all have the same one so that we can talk for free and Chris is paying 10 bucks a month for his phone.
anyway personally I think this job will be off limits very soon.
take care and best of luck Claire

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Claire E Allen

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By Kathy L. on Tue, 09-20-05, 14:53

Wow, Claire. That situation is what all us parents and their pa children fear. I supposed this is a decision you and your son would have to make, but it seems like you already made up your mind that he has to find another job.

Peanut oil is more expensive, so I wonder why some places use it. From watching the Food Network on TV, it does have a high smoke point, and it does add certain flavoring to your more "gourmet" foods. How many customers are they losing because of their choice of oil?

I wish you and your son well.

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By Just Looking on Fri, 09-30-05, 05:03

I am not PA but do have a severe penicillin allergy as well as allergies to literally every antibiotic I have ever taken.

And what do I do? I work in the veterinary medical field, of course! :-)

This is actually a bigger deal than one might think. Injectable penicillin is very commonly used and accidental needle sticks happen, especially when dealing with an uncooperative patient. One of my colleagues was recently accidentally injected with a drug that was intended for a patient because the person who was giving the injection did not realize that the needle was in the person helping her and not in the dog. So it can definitely happen.

The other risk is from animal bites. Again, it's something that does not happen frequently but it does happen. Dog and cat bites can cause really nasty infections if they are deep enough. And of course, nasty infections require treatment with antibiotics.

I made a choice to have this career, knowing the risks. But I do take steps to keep myself safe. I make sure my employer knows about my allergies. I keep Benadryl in my locker at all times. I do not have an Epi-pen but epi is a standard drug in stock at all veterinary hospitals so I do have access to it if needed. I either ask a colleague to reconstitute powdered antibiotic suspensions instead or I wear a mask while mixing the powder to minimize exposure to aerosolized particles. And if we are giving an animal a shot of penicillin, I try to make sure I am the one giving the shot instead of holding the animal since there is less risk of accidentally being injected myself that way.

And that's it. My antibiotic allergies are not a 24/7 concern for me the way PA is but if there is any field that should be "off limits" to me, this is the one! But with just a few precautions, I do not feel that I am at significant risk.

My mom would probably have a heart attack if she knew some of the stuff I do on a daily basis, but I am an adult now and responsible for making decisions about my own health. I love my work and can't imagine doing anything else.

[This message has been edited by Just Looking (edited September 30, 2005).]

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