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Anyone have a safe potting soil? Jut called Scotts brand and not safe!

9 replies [Last post]
By Danielle on Fri, 08-31-07, 19:49

We need a safe potting soil for school projects and I just called Scott's and they had peanut and nut by products in their soils. Last year, they told me they were safe. Anyone find a safe one? Thanks

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By Lori Jo on Fri, 08-31-07, 20:34

Wow. Why are they not safe?

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By summercreek on Sat, 03-21-15, 15:25

We make an organic potting soil from COIR fiber, it is safe for childeren, Contact me at [email protected]

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By Jen224 on Sat, 09-01-07, 00:52

Do they label for this? We used Scott's potting soil all summer----ooops!

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Jen
DS#1--3 years old: allergic to peanuts & fish
DS#2--6 months old: NKA

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By SallyL on Sat, 09-01-07, 01:11

Now THIS is something I would have NEVER thought to be concerned about. I never call manufacturers anyways, but I wouldn't have even thought to read it. Good to know!

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By Danielle on Sat, 09-01-07, 14:44

Last year I called Scott's and the kids in pre-K through 2nd used their potting soil because they said it was safe. Yesterday, I called again because the teacher had purchased Scott's soil and she wanted to double check. I looked at the bag and it looked fine and then I went on line and looked up the specific ingredients and it read that it was still safe. However, I also called and to my surprise and the customer service rep (Tiffany) great dismay she looked it up and the ingredients listed PEANUT and NUT by products. I was stunned and told her to send my complaints and how dangerous this is. The other thing, this Scott's soil was sold in a kit for kids to use at school with teachers.

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By gw_mom3 on Sat, 09-01-07, 20:11

I just remembered that I have a bag of african violet soil that I am *sure* is scott's. I think it's in the basement (which is full of spiders-eww) so I'll have dh check and throw it out if it's theirs.

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[b]~Gale~[/b]

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By Sarahfran1 on Sat, 09-01-07, 20:29

I'd be curious to know what they mean by "peanut and nut byproducts" exactly. Does that mean that once the peanut farmer is finished harvesting the peanuts, the plant itself is thrown in a pile and composted and that is included in Scott's potting soil? Because that would easily be well within my zone of comfort, since it's the protein in the harvested nut that is the danger. That and the fact that composting something for a year should break it down to something that bears no more resemblance to the original plant than composted cow manure bears a resemblance to a fresh cowpie in a field.

But if they mean that they are including peanut and nut shells ground up as filler, that might concern me more. In any event, I don't think I'd stop using something without either knowing exactly what the level of danger is unless there is evidence that it HAS caused a problem in someone with a peanut allergy.

That said, it's pretty easy to make your own potting soil from sterilized garden soil, peat moss, perlite, limestone and superphosphate (all of which can be bought at a garden center except the garden soil, but you can rent or buy sterilizers to sterilize your own soil, and if you start with compost you've made yourself then you know exactly what the ingredients are). You can also, to make things easier, replace the garden soil with peat moss and then add some fertilizer. That's simpler to make, but the result is really lightweight so you have to be careful using it with large plants. It works great for starting seeds, though. You can google "making potting soil" for exact amounts of each to make sure the mixture you're using is balanced.

Sarah

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By gw_mom3 on Sat, 09-01-07, 20:33

Quote:Originally posted by Sarahfran1:
[b]In any event, I don't think I'd stop using something without either knowing exactly what the level of danger is unless there is evidence that it HAS caused a problem in someone with a peanut allergy.[/b]

If Scotts is like most other companies, the cs reps would have no clue exactly what parts of the peanut OR the peanut plant are in the potting mix. The thing is that there are plenty of other brands that are probably safe (or like you said, make your own). I don't know about waiting for someone to have a reaction. That's like someone threatening to kill or hurt people and the authorities not being able to do anything about it until someone is killed or hurt. With my dd I tend to err on the side of caution-especially with something as non-essential as potting soil.

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[b]~Gale~[/b]

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By henrietts on Tue, 06-02-09, 01:27

We discovered today that an actual peanut plant had grown from a nut in the potting soil we used to start some seeds. I thought it was a sweet pea plant, migrated over from another tray of seeds. But 7 yr-old DD noticed that it different than the others in that tray, asked her dad what it was, and upon further inspection her dad found a peanut shell lying next to it. They looked up a picture of a peanut plant, and that's what it is.

I'm going to be taking the soil and the plants back to the store, getting a refund, and giving the contaminated plants to a neighbor. I think the soil was Scotts, sorry, it's late and the bag is in the shed. So much for the home-grown carrots this year. I didn't even think to check soil, though I check birdseed and most everything else. Who would have thought?

Susan

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