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Now a possible Soy Allergy & Asthma?

Bear with me this might get long but I need some advise.

History:
-At 1 yo my son was diagnosed with a mild (class 1-2) peanut allergy
-levels retested at 2 yo and were slightly worse solid class 2 peanut allergy
-at 3.5 yo IgE and skin test were redone. Peanut allergy increased to a solid class 3.
- no major allergies besides some mild seasonal allergies on skin test none on blood.
-Adnoids removed (1.5 yo) and tubes inserted (3 yo) bc of constant mouth breathing, chronic congestion and hearing loss (not bc of chronic ear infections just some stuck fluid in the ear)
-3.5 to 4 yo first signs of asthma resulting in 3 vists to the ER in the last 4 mo.

Present day:
(my son will be 4 yo this weekend 10/27)
October 12 my son came in contact with something that covered is body in horrendous hives. After 12 hours of trying to treat at home we began to notice congestion and difficulty breathing. We headed to the ER for the 4th time in 4 mo. He was given steroids and antihistemines. 24 hours after the initial reaction he became extremely lethargic and hives were only progressing worse. We made an emergency visit to the allergist where we were prescibed heavy oral steroids and a prescription anthistemine. Blood was drawn to try to determine the root of the reaction.

Allergist called saying that the peanut IgE was very high and was now a class 4 allergy and that he must have come in contact with trace peanuts on something he ate. Continue steroids and Atarax for 3 more days

October 23 picked my son up from preschool and he was having a mild asthma attack. I gave him his rescue inhaler and he proceeded to still cough and wheeze. We gave him left over steroids as well as Atarx. He slept through the night and woke up much better.
October 24 (today) I called the allergist requesting to see my sons blood work to begin to try and narrow down the root cause of his asthma. Upon reviewing his labs his peanut IgE was 31 and now a solid class 4 allergy. Everything else was in normal range.

THEN.... I noticed his Soy IgE was 2.20 which seems to be a class 2 reaction. I didnt remember my allergist ever mentioning a soy allergy to me. I flipped through more papers and saw a blood work from 5 months ago were in here as well. 5 months ago his IgE for Soy was ONLY 0.42. In 5 months his IgE had increased 5x!

Could my son have had a reaction to Soy back on Oct 12? Is he now allergic to Soy? How high should an IgE be in order to cause you to begin to eliminate Soy from his diet? Could this soy issue be whats causing his sudden asthma attacks?

Im at such a loss right now.

By rudy117 on Tue, 01-07-14, 05:12

Soy and peanuts are related (legumes) and those with peanut allergies need to be aware that they may be susceptible to soy allergies as well. I would definitely demand clarification on those soy numbers by your allergist/pediatrician and what precaution (if any) are necessary. Also, the school needs to collaborate with you to create a safe learning environment for your child. Every exposure to the offending allergen can cause the severity of the allergy to get worse. (Which would explain the progression of the numbers from mild to severe).

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By Hdmech10 on Mon, 11-04-13, 03:55

Just a thought but possibly removing all legumes from your child would be a good idea. Peanuts, soy, beans, peas, chickpeas, hummus, lentils. I'm no doctor just a carpenter that's had similar but much less severe reactions. Removing those foods has helped a lot. I went 10 years with lung problem never diagnosed with asthma one trip to the allergist said I was allergic to peanuts with a soy and wheat intolerance removed those foods as much as possible and no inhaler needed. I think it would be a good idea to look into that possibility with your allergist. Hope this helps good luck best wishes for you and your little guy.

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