Login | Register

Cross reactions to Soy?

Hello there, wondering if anyone Has experienced problems with soy or other legumes? I have adult onset PA. Just diagnosed, but suspected for a couple years. Accidental exposure has caused two cases of hives from neck go toes for me, (couldn't control the hives with benedryl, + clariton + benedryl creme). Lasting a week and a week and a half respectively. The week was trace cross contamination, the week and a half I actually ate something that had peanuts in it apparently. I guess that's non anaphylactic.

On the other hand, chickpeas for me are worse. I ate something a family member made that had hummus in it. Upon swallowing it stopped in my throat above my collerbone but below my larynx. I couldn't even swallow water. It hurt like crazy. The throat problem was cleared by the vomiting a few min later, and I felt really tired and shaky. I figured it was the stress. Guess that one was a full on anaphylactic reaction.

Went to an allergist and got IgE testing, peanut was 3.46 chickpeas only 4.22 and soy is 1.12. All on the low side on things. But my allergist is saying I am probably allergic to soy as well and has told me to practice strict avoidance of all 3. Having such a problem finding things without soy, that I'm seriously considering saying "screw that" and just avoiding the chickpeas and peanuts. I've felt better after cutting soy out of my diet, less "off" and mild trouble swallowing went away. I didn't even realise it was there until it was gone. But I cut wheat out with soy, since they go hand in hand.

I only had IgE testing done with blood work. No scratch test. (Severe phobia of needles). They have only checked soy, peanut and chickpea + the usual environmental factors. (I have asthma). So no information on wheat, or most other things. I have a scratch test scheduled for just after Christmas.

I guess my question is this: anyone else have multiple legumes they are allergic to? Or cases where they were told "strict avoidance" on one, but were not allergic? I'm mostly curious if I'm really allergic to soy, esp with that low of an IgE number. But then, my numbers on peanuts and chickpeas are not that high either

I have other known (but not tested) allergies as well, I stopped eating watermelon, peaches and pears more than 10 years ago due to mouth tingling and trouble swallowing. I also have asthma that requires daily suppressant to control.

By TeddyCan on Mon, 02-15-16, 17:14

Sorry to hear your story. You better stay away from Processed meats, Worcestershire sauce, Vegetable oil, High-protein energy bars and snacks, Tofu, Tamari. Ask your doctor about your diet. He is the best to suggest you what you should do.

Groups: None
By TeddyCan on Mon, 02-15-16, 17:13

Sorry to hear your story. You better stay away from Processed meats, Worcestershire sauce, Vegetable oil, High-protein energy bars and snacks, Tofu, Tamari. Ask your doctor about your diet. He is the best to suggest you what you should do.

Groups: None
By TeddyCan on Sun, 02-07-16, 15:38

Yes, I have a friend who is allergic to soy. She suffered from fever blisters, fever, skin reactions including hives and eczema, itching and swelling and even conjunctivitis until she went for an allergy test and had been diagnosed.

Groups: None
By jap on Tue, 02-02-16, 17:17

My daughter is allergic to peanut , lentils and peas + soy
over 90% of people allergic to lentils are allergic to soy.

On the plus side unless anaphylactic most people allergic to soy can safely eat soy oil and soy lecithin, only have to avoid soy protein.
this will open up many more options to avoid peanut and soy oil and lecithin, well it would be easier to get a G-tube.

Remember Arachic oil = peanut

Groups: None
By jap on Tue, 02-02-16, 17:17

My daughter is allergic to peanut , lentils and peas + soy
over 90% of people allergic to lentils are allergic to soy.

On the plus side unless anaphylactic most people allergic to soy can safely eat soy oil and soy lecithin, only have to avoid soy protein.
this will open up many more options to avoid peanut and soy oil and lecithin, well it would be easier to get a G-tube.

Remember Arachic oil = peanut

Groups: None
By vinucube on Tue, 11-24-15, 02:06

If you can tolerate very small doses, it may be best to continue consuming such doses. Strict avoidance can make the allergy worse.

Fatal allergy as a possible consequence of long-term elimination diet.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15147454

That skin prick allergy test may not be safe. You might develop new allergies from it.

On a related note:
Arumugham V (2015) Evidence that Food Proteins in Vaccines Cause the Development of Food Allergies and Its Implications for Vaccine Policy. J Develop Drugs 4: 137. doi:10.4172/2329-6631.1000137
http://www.omicsgroup.org/journals/evidence-that-food-proteins-in-vaccines-cause-the-development-of-foodallergies-and-its-implications-for-vaccine-policy-2329-6631-1000137.pdf

Groups: None
By StridAst on Mon, 11-23-15, 16:04

Thank you for the replies people. I do have an epi-pen that I am carrying with me everywhere now, but I'll also make a point to keep benadryl on hand too. (I do draw the line at prednisone, I have some at home, but that stuff is just sooo problematic to stop using, that I feel it best to be more cautious with it. (+ I only have about 10 pills worth, which isn't enough for an intensive course) I'll avoid the soy strictly for now, while I'm not convinced how severe the soy allergy is, the last thing I want is something else that does in fact cause severe symptoms. Definitely going to get myself tested on wheat at my next appt (right after christmas). even with the legumes out of my diet, I still have regular gastrointestinal distress, and mild but persistant itching so there is a good chance there are other things in my diet that don't agree with me.

The worst part about these food allergies, is that a few years ago I had no real problems, could eat what I liked, and some of the things I cant have now are things I really did love to eat. I HATE walking down the candy isle at the store and seeing peanut m&ms..... or pearson nut rolls... or with needing to avoid soy, cant even go get a burger anymore. =/ I know its not worth the risk, but this is going to be one of the hardest things to deal with.

Groups: None
By Lucía on Sun, 11-22-15, 22:25

I have a severe PA, if I eat peanuts I will suffer of anaphilaxis. This past years I have been diagnosed with soy allergy (medium), chickpeas and lentils alergies. With chickpeas and lentils my mouth just starts itching so I avoid eat in them,but I know nothing really wrong it's gonna happen. With my soy allergy I don't eat soy beans or soy sauce and I don't go to chinese or asiatic restaurants beacuse they have dishes that cointains soy. In home if I see something that has soy stract I eat it and I don't mind. I don't suffer of anaphilaxis I just have to eat some tablets and I will feel right.
With peanuts I don't eat them, I don't eat anything that can contain them, if I see a label on a product that it says nuts I don't eat it. I don't let anyone touch me or kiss me if they have eat them. I am very very careful. And I don't go to mexican or thai restaurants. Once I have a severe reaction for eating satay sauce, be careful with all the sauces!
I don't eat melon because my moutch itch me if I eat them.
Sorry for my english and I hope that I helped.

Groups: None
By PeanutAllergy.com on Sat, 11-21-15, 20:20

Question of the Week: Answered!

Every week, PeanutAllergy.com answers one of the questions posted in our community.

Our Answer:

We are sorry to hear that you are struggling with different types of food allergies. You have taken the right steps by getting tested. It’s important to know what foods or elements can cause allergic reactions. And from your past experiences, it sounds like you know what to avoid.

Soy allergy is actually one of the top eight most prevalent food allergies in the U.S. It is an especially difficult allergy to manage, as you mentioned, because almost half of all processed foods contain some soy. In addition, some people can actually react to some forms of soy and not others. It is advisable that you follow your doctor’s advice about avoiding soy because it is hard to pinpoint exactly what forms you might be allergic to in your diet. For example, some people are allergic to soy milk but not other soy products. You can read more about soy allergy here.

You might want to consider getting tested for a wheat allergy as well if you haven’t already. Wheat allergies are different from celiac disease in that the person with the allergy gets symptoms like hives and an itchy throat. A wheat allergy can be caused by four different proteins found in wheat. Read more about that here.

Make sure to take precautionary steps to avoid an allergic reaction. Always check the labels on food. You can read more tips on how to handle dealing with a food allergy here.

We also reached out to our Facebook community with you question, and you can see their responses here.

We always recommend speaking with your doctor about your concerns and symptoms.

We hope this information is helpful. Take care!

Groups: None
By stratmom on Fri, 11-20-15, 18:24

Yes, both of my PA daughters are allergic/sensitive to soy and legumes. They are also both allergic to peanuts and tree nuts. Neither of them eat chickpeas, products that contain soy protein, or lentils.

My older daughter is, what I would call "allergic" while my younger daughter is what I would call "sensitive." This is because my stupid allergist never explained that soy and peanuts are botanically related, so when my older daughter was a toddler I was still feeding her tofu (in soup at Chinese restaurants) and let her eat pancakes (at iHOP) and bread products that contained soy flour. As a result, she became sensitized to soy and now she needs to stay away from it. It makes her throat itch and her lips swell up -- we don't want to take the chance that it could balloon into full-fledged anaphalyaxis. I became aware of the problem when my younger daughter was a still a baby, so I kept her away from soy. Therefore, she can eat legumes and products with soy flour and has no reaction. She still tries to avoid them, however.

My daughters are young adults now -- and even though it's 20 years later, I'm still pissed at the allergist for not telling me about the possible cross-reaction. At the time (late 90s) there wasn't much info about this on the internet.

If you have had reactions to chickpeas and soy, you should not eat them! Every allergic reaction compounds the problem and makes things worse. You could be setting yourself up for full-blown anaphalaxis and possibly die if you don't pay attention to your body! I hope you always carry an Epi-pen, Benedryl, and Prednisone with you!

Groups: None

Peanut Free and Nut Free Directory

Our directory is highlights our favorite products for people with peanut and nut allergies.