Egg Allergy Oral Food Challenge

(This is a continuation of a series of posts on our experiences as we trial our son who has multiple food allergies with oral food challenges at home. Oral food challenges should always be performed under direct medical supervision based on each patients individual reaction history. Please do not try oral food challenges at home on your own without medical approval.)
I am literally sitting  here is tears as I write this. I think our son just failed his baked egg allergy oral food challenge…badly. It’s heartbreaking to see him react so badly after such a successful wheat allergy oral food challenge. It’s heartbreaking to see him have a reaction and know that we might have caused it, even though we were only trying to do what we thought was best for him, trying to try to help him be healthier.
Egg Allergy Oral Food Challenge

Egg Allergy Oral Food Challenge

Our egg allergy challenge actually began last month and was successful at first. Colton had eaten homemade bread and cookies that included baked wheat and baked egg with no reaction for weeks. We were on cloud nine! We were so thrilled our son had seemingly outgrown another food allergy. We continued to bake more bread and cookies for him, and kept feeding him and watching.
Then, it happened. We found an eczema spot here, and a spot there, but they would quickly go away. He’d be fine for a week, all the while still eating our homemade bread and cookies. Then we’d find eczema again and it would go away again. Was this really a food allergy reaction or something environmental?
Tonight, Colton had a runny nose and I started second guessing everything. Was it the baked egg? He said his mouth hurt last night, could it be teething that was causing his runny nose? And I don’t feel the best, maybe he has a cold? Could it be our cat? He’s allergic to cats but our’s doesn’t usually bother him. Maybe it did tonight for some reason.
I followed my gut and started making phone calls to his allergist, and posting questions for my food allergy friends on Facebook and Twitter. I hated the feedback I was getting. It was all bad news. One word was mentioned from multiple people, the one word I didn’t want to hear, anaphylaxis.
Within minutes his legs flared with eczema and he started having difficulty breathing. We could hear him wheezing and we could hear his breaths getting shorter. We grabbed the Benadryl and the Xopenex and gave him the largest doses we could safely give here at home. His breathing slowed and the wheezing went away. We slathered his eczema in Triamcinolone Acetonide Ointment. Then we waited, and watched the rest of the night.
I’m afraid my baby just failed his baked egg challenge. Was this a mild anaphylactic reaction? Is there such a thing as a mild anaphylactic reaction? He went from a simple runny nose to flaring with difficulty breathing so fast. I have no idea if his symptoms would have continued to worsen or not if we hadn’t treated him. I don’t want to know. I’m just happy he’s feeling better, laying here next to me.
Image courtesy of Flickr.
DISCLAIMER: I am not a doctor or healthcare professional. This is simply a recount of our personal experience. Always check with a doctor about any allergy-related issues.
Stacy Molter
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